Clean plate club membership may open door to obesity
April 23rd, 2013
09:30 AM ET
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While growing up, many children may have heard "clean your plate" or been denied candy. But how do parental attitudes toward food affect a child's weight?

Denying certain foods to children or pressuring them to eat every bit of a meal are common practices among many parents. But researchers at the University of Minnesota found parents who restricted foods were more likely to have overweight or obese children. And while those who pressured children to eat all of their meals mostly had children of normal weight, it adversely affected the way those children ate as they grew older, according to the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.
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Bust out the coffee and chocolate - caffeine may help prevent skin cancer
July 2nd, 2012
01:00 PM ET
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Good news, java junkies: Researchers have found the more coffee you drink, the more you may be protecting yourself against skin cancer.

According to a new report published in the journal Cancer Research, drinking more caffeinated coffee could lower your chances of developing basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer.
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Filed under: Chocolate • Coffee • Food as Medicine • Health News • News • Sip


ADHD, the FDA and Blue Dye #1
March 31st, 2011
10:30 AM ET
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A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee began weighing evidence Wednesday on whether dye additives in food affects behavior in children. The panel listened to testimony from doctors and scientists who contend that studies, although small in many cases, do show that some kids begin to show signs of hyperactivity once they are exposed to certain dye mixtures.

The question is, should the FDA committee urge the agency to strengthen its regulation of these ingredients?

According to the experts who testified, European companies already are dropping dyes including Blue #1, Yellow #5, Green #3 and others and substituting natural dyes for them. But the United States still allows artificial dyes, mostly for aesthetic reasons, not for taste.

Read Evidence of food dye-ADHD link weak, FDA told



USDA says halt the salt
January 31st, 2011
09:14 AM ET
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The federal government plans to unveil new dietary guidelines Monday that urge people to eat less salt, a U.S. Department of Agriculture spokesman said Monday.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius plan to formally unveil the guidelines at 10 a.m.

The guidelines, which are updated every five years, recommended that those over 51, African Americans and people with a history of hypertension, diabetes or kidney problems limit their salt intake to a little over a half a teaspoon. For everyone else, the daily recommendation remains at 2,300 milligrams - about one teaspoon of salt.

Read Feds: Eat less salt



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