Got allergies? Fast food may be at fault
January 15th, 2013
12:15 AM ET
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Teenagers and young children who eat fast food could be increasing their risk of developing asthma, eczema and hay fever, according to a study published Monday in the British Medical Journal's respiratory journal Thorax.

The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) study used written questionnaires completed by 319,196 13- and 14-year-olds from 51 countries and by the parents of 181,631 6- and 7-year-olds in 31 countries. They were asked if they had symptoms of the three conditions and about their weekly diet – including the types of foods they ate over the last year, and how often.
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Papaya recalled, linked to salmonella outbreak
July 25th, 2011
01:30 PM ET
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Contaminated papaya appears to be the cause of an outbreak of Salmonella in 23 states the Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers. The FDA says papayas imported from Mexico and distributed by Agromod Produce Inc. of McAllen, Texas, is likely the source of 97 cases of Salmonella agona. To date 10 people have been hospitalized but there have been no reported deaths. As a result, Agromod Produce has voluntarily recalled all papaya sold before July 23.

The cases were reported between January 1 and July 18 in Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio. Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. While ages ranged from 1 year to 91 years old, the average age of those stricken is 20. More than half of the cases are women. Texas had the most cases with 25 people falling ill.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Salmonella agona  is one of about 2,000 strains of salmonella. Symptoms usually show up 12 to 72 hours after infection and can last up to seven days. Approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported each year in the U.S.

Read the full story: "23-state Salmonella outbreak linked to papaya"

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Filed under: Fruits • News • Recalls • Salmonella


Lawsuit wants McDonald's to stop toying around
December 16th, 2010
10:00 AM ET
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A California woman is suing McDonald's claiming the fast-food giant uses toys to market directly to young children. Monet Parham, a Sacramento, California, mother of two small children filed the lawsuit Wednesday in San Francisco along with health, nutrition and food safety advocates Center for Science in the Public Interest . CSPI is seeking court approval to proceed as a class action.

Parham, a 41-year old state employee, says her kids repeatedly ask for Happy Meals, mainly for the toys. "We have to say no to our kids so many times and McDonald's makes that so much harder to do. I object to the fact that McDonald's is getting into my kids' heads without my permission and actually changing what my kids want to eat."

Michael Jacobson, CSPI's executive director accused McDonald's of "one of the most insidious marketing practices–dangling a toy in front of a small child." Jacobson called the practice "unfair, deceptive and illegal' in California and many other states. "The food industry has a responsibility not to intrude into families by using sleazy marketing techniques getting kids to pester their parents."

Read the full story on CNN Health - "Woman sues McDonald's over Happy Meals"

Previously - "San Francisco bans fast food toys"



December 6th, 2010
02:30 PM ET
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The first guidelines for diagnosing and managing food allergies were released Monday by The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI).

Designed by and for allergists, immunologists and other health care professionals, the guidelines represent the best practices for management of a disease where there is no current treatment.

It's a framework intended to help doctors make appropriate decisions about treating patients, but not fixed rules that must be followed. Doctors and patients still need to develop individual treatment plans based on the circumstance of the patient.

The most common food allergens in this country are milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, wheat and soy. Milk and eggs are the two most common allergies seen in pediatric patients, but 80 percent of children outgrow them.

Read Docs get guide for ID'ing food allergies



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