September 25th, 2013
05:30 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits New Mexico in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, September 29, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Red or green?

"That’s the, by the way, state question in New Mexico," says Dan Flores, a historian who specializes in studies of the American West.

He's talking about chiles, the bedrock of New Mexican cuisine and a disputed ingredient 'round these parts.

In this week's episode of "Parts Unknown," Anthony Bourdain travels to the Land of Enchantment to cruise Route 66 for tacos and delve into the state's gun culture.
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September 18th, 2013
02:15 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits Granada, Spain, in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, September 22, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Granada lies at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in the southern Spanish region of Andalusia.

The city was the final bastion of the Spanish Moors, before they fell to the Catholic monarchs Ferdinand V and Isabella I in 1492.

"This is where devout Catholicism mixes with surrealism, modernist cuisine with traditional tapas. Christianity and Islam traded places, shared space. And the effects and influences of all those things are right here to see," Anthony Bourdain says.

Yet, there are many parts of Granada's culture that are decidedly Spanish in nature: siestas, bullfighting, Flamenco and, of course, tapas.

According to Bourdain, "You may think you know what a tapa is, like if you’ve had small bites at some fusion hipster bar where they do a whole lot of little plates. Yeah. That ain’t a tapa."
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September 11th, 2013
06:30 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, best-selling author and Emmy-winning television personality Anthony Bourdain returns for the second season of CNN's showcase for coverage of food and travel. "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown" is shot entirely on location and premieres September 15 at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook. Bourdain's first stop: Israel, the West Bank and Gaza.

Israel exists as an intersection of three major religions, Christianity, Judaism and Islam, creating a complex blend of cuisines.

In the Season 2 premiere of "Parts Unknown," Anthony Bourdain visits Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip for the very first time. "The most contentious piece of real estate in the world," he calls it, citing its 4,000 years of intense political and religious conflict.

In Jerusalem, Bourdain meets up with Yotam Ottolenghi, the chef and owner of Ottolenghi and Nopi restaurants in London, and co-author of the runaway best-selling cookbook, "Jerusalem." Ottolenghi, who is Jewish, wrote the book with Sami Tamimi, a Palestinian chef who grew up on the opposite side of the divided city.

It doesn't take long for Bourdain to discover that even the roots of certain foods are fiercely debated.
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August 6th, 2013
01:30 PM ET
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Editor's note: Video by Jeremy Harlan, CNN photojournalist; text by Sarah LeTrent, Eatocracy editor.

Some residents of Grand Isle, Vermont, don’t want to talk about what happened in that blue building on Pearl Street. Others have an awful lot to say on the matter.

A cattle trailer, spray-painted in red with the Animal Liberation Front’s acronym “ALF,” still sits out front of the complex now shrouded in overgrown weeds.

It’s an eerie reminder of the events just four years ago that thrust this tiny town of fewer than 2,000 people into the national spotlight.

In October 2009, the now-deserted structure – which once housed the veal processing plant Bushway Packing Inc. - was permanently shut down by the U.S. Department of Agriculture after an animal protection organization, the Humane Society of the United States, revealed an undercover video showing plant workers kicking, dragging, stunning and skinning live calves that were less than a month old.

It was yet another blow to the U.S. veal industry, which has long been mired in conflict with animal welfare groups because of its use of crates to restrain the calves’ movement.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, consumers seldom cite animal welfare as a concerning food issue but express it as “a matter of high concern” for veal.

But just 40 miles from where that horrifying video was filmed in Grand Isle, in the small town of Fairfield, Vermont, the folks behind Stony Pond Farm are among a number of smaller-scale dairy farmers trying to persuade consumers and fellow farmers alike to think outside the pen when it comes to veal – and they’re aiming to make more humane rearing and slaughtering practices an industry standard.
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July 10th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
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Editor's Note: In the midst of a record-breaking heat wave, we could all probably use a cold drink. Here to help us are Karl Injex and Navarro Carr, the owner and bar manager respectively of the Sound Table in Atlanta.Visual aids provided by Mark Hill, the Director of Photography for Turner Broadcasting.

You are probably acquainted with the mint julep, made with Kentucky bourbon and often enjoyed while sporting an elaborate chapeau at the Churchill Downs Racetrack.

The Genever julep is its lighter-spirited relative; substituting gin for the brown water. (Genever, sometimes referred to as Holland or Dutch gin, is oak-aged and less dry than the later styles like Old Tom gin.)

A heap of crushed ice keeps the drink frigid, while the mint adds a tongue-tingling sensation.  Fun fact: Menthol, the organic compound in mint, stimulates the same nerve receptors in your mouth that cold temperatures do - hence the cooling sensation.

Despite the urge to gulp down anything cold in a glistening arm's reach, sipping is advised.
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June 28th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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While Pat LaFrieda Jr.'s notable sandwich has cheese, steak and onions on toasted bread, it's definitely not a cheese steak. It’s in a league of its own.

"This has nothing to do with Philly cheese steak," LaFrieda said, with an air of pumped-up regional pride.

The third-generation butcher conceived the sandwich as a hat tip to the Brooklyn sandwich shops he grew up visiting.

The sandwich features black Angus beef topped with Monterey Jack cheese and caramelized onions, and served au jus on a toasted baguette. It debuted at LaFrieda's concession stand in 2012 at the New York Mets' Citi Field, and hungry fans have formed a meaty, cheesy, greasy bond with it ever since.

While filet mignon (a very tender cut from the small end of the tenderloin) may seem extravagant, LaFrieda says it's a natural choice for the sandwich. If the beef is too tough, the whole piece of steak will pull out of the sandwich with one bite, so tenderness is key.

Here's how to make the heavy hitter at home.
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June 7th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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Editor's Note: It's Friday, and it's been a long week – we could all probably use a drink. Here to help us are Karl Injex and Navarro Carr, the owner and bar manager respectively of the Sound Table in Atlanta.Visual aids provided by Mark Hill, the Director of Photography for Turner Broadcasting.

The first rule of Pegu Club? Don't talk, drink.

In "The Savoy Cocktail Book," famed mixologist Harry Craddock wrote of the gin-based libation: "The favourite cocktail of the Pegu Club, Burma, and one that has traveled, and is asked for, around the world."

Rudyard Kipling also patronized the popular gentleman's social club in British colonial Rangoon. In his collection of travel letters entitled "From Sea to Sea," he wrote: "The Pegu Club seemed to be full of men on their way up or down, and the conversation was but an echo of the murmur of conquest far away to the north."

Now that the club is deserted and a derelict reminder of colonial rule, the only way to visit the Far East watering hole is by making its namesake cocktail at home.
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June 5th, 2013
07:00 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, June 9, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

"Good food is going to be a challenge soon, so we take the opportunity to fill up on what we can," Anthony Bourdain says, fueling up at a local restaurant before leaving Goma. This city in the Democratic Republic of Congo lies at the foot of the Nyiragongo Volcano and has a population of about one million people - many of whom are internally displaced.

Grilled chicken, ugali and piri piri pepper make “a pretty nice meal," Bourdain finds.

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May 15th, 2013
06:00 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits Libya in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, May 19, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Fried dough is arguably a universal language. There are about as many ways to enjoy sfinz - a spongy, light (albeit fried) pastry eaten across the Middle East and North Africa - as there are variations and even spellings.

In Libya, it's sfinz. In Morocco, it's sfenj. In Tunisia, yoyos; and in Italy, sfinge. (Leptis Magna, on the coast of Libya, was once a highly prominent city of the Roman Empire; it's also an UNESCO World Heritage site.)

This week, Anthony Bourdain travels to the North African country that is still trying to find its footing after long-term ruler Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown by an uprising in 2011.
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