Eatocracy: We're going there
August 7th, 2014
08:00 AM ET
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Dear readers,

Fix yourself a plate, grab a drink from the cooler and sit down with us for a minute. We've got some exciting news to feast on.

Like the rest of our colleagues at CNN, Eatocracy is gonna Go There. Uh - over there, actually, to our new home on CNN.com.

We'll still cook up the same robust blend of food news, culture and politics, opinion, cooking tutorials, heartfelt essays, goofy musings and eye-rolling food puns that Eatocracy has been serving on the blog for the past four years. But expect an extra helping of slow-braised, bigger, badder, deeper stories that might even (gasp!) take us away from our desks every once in a while and out into the unknown.

We're hungry for this new adventure and we invite you to join us at the table.

Cheers,

Kat Kinsman and Sarah LeTrent

Our new home: Eatocracy on CNN.com

Go There

p.s. You'll still be able to find older stories right here on the blog, but make sure to bookmark eatocracy.cnn.com to get here.



June 13th, 2014
06:00 PM ET
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Can a person learn the art of hospitality?

That’s the question the organizers of the first Welcome Conference want to pose to participants both within and outside the restaurant industry. This sold-out, service-focused event will be held in New York City on June 17, and the team behind it hopes their message will spread.

“Service is black and white, hospitality is color,” says Will Guidara, one of the organizers. He’s the co-owner and restaurateur of Eleven Madison Park and The NoMad in New York; the former most recently earned the No. 4 spot on San Pellegrino’s notably buzzworthy World’s 50 Best Restaurants List.

What he’s talking about is the somewhat recent trend of restaurants extending beyond traditional service and taking extra measures - like Googling guests or handling special occasions - to make their diners feel like active and unique participants in their own experience.

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June 4th, 2014
06:00 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy-winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits Bahia, Brazil, in the season finale of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, June 8, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Residents of Bahia, Brazil, may be getting ready to play host to many of the 2014 FIFA World Cup matches, but their lively Afro-Brazilian culture is proudly on display in the streets and on the beaches year-round.

Amid the state's intoxicating samba rhythms, colorful art scene and vibrant lifestyle is an equally intoxicating cocktail of lime, sugar and cachaça - the caipirinha, which just happens to be Brazil's national drink.

"What’s magical about this cocktail is the first taste, it’s like, 'I don’t know man. It’s a little too something.' And then that second sip, it’s like, 'aw, that’s kinda good.' Then the third sip, it’s 'where are my pants?'" host Anthony Bourdain says as he guzzles one in the streets of the capital city of Salvador.

For the season finale of "Parts Unknown," muddle up this refreshing drink at home and let your cares slip away to the beat of the drums.

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May 28th, 2014
04:00 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy-winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits Thailand in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, June 1, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

In Thailand, a person might greet a friend with the phrase "kin khao reu yang?" to simply ask how things are going.

The more literal translation, however, is: "Have you eaten rice yet?"

"In this part of the world you live and die by the harvest," Anthony Bourdain says of Chiang Mai province's fertile fields and sticky-rice-filled tables.

In this week's episode of "Parts Unknown," Bourdain travels to the northern Thai city of Chiang Mai to eat, drink and sweat his way through every night market, roadside restaurant and karaoke bar he can handle in the country's second largest city.

"It was like discovering a color I never knew existed before," Bourdain recalls of his first trip to Thailand more than a decade ago.

The region's multi-dimensional flavor profile (simultaneously sweet, salty, spicy, bitter and herbaceous) is hard to replicate outside Northern Thailand due to the availability and hyper-locality of some ingredients, but one chef, Andy Ricker, has made it his mission to recreate the food stateside. He specializes in "the good stuff," Bourdain says - like the region's ubiquitous dish of khao soi, a coconut milk and curry paste noodle soup topped with a nest of fried noodles, lime wedges and cilantro.

Ricker is the chef and owner of the acclaimed Pok Pok family of restaurants in Portland, Oregon, and New York City. The name of the restaurant is an onomatopoeic ode to the sound the pestle makes when it pounds ingredients into pastes in a mortar.

Test out your own mortar and pestle skills with a variation of the chile paste naam phrik, preferably the Chiang Mai way, with motorbikes whizzing by and a ice-filled glass of beer close at hand.
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