How the Perfect Bacon Bowl created so much sizzle
April 7th, 2014
11:46 AM ET
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It's no secret that America loves its bacon. For proof, just look at the crazy success of the Perfect Bacon Bowl, As Seen on TV's newest sensation.

The Perfect Bacon Bowl resembles an upside-down plastic bowl. Wrap three strips of bacon around it, pop it in the oven, microwave or toaster oven and the bacon cooks in the shape of the container - a "bacon bowl." Then you fill it with whatever you want - scrambled eggs, dip, mac 'n cheese.

The Perfect Bacon Bowl debuted in November 2013 on As Seen on TV and almost immediately became a hit. Since then, more than two million boxes have been sold (they come two to a box and retail for $10.99).
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Filed under: Bacon • Marketing • Meat • Small Business • Stunt


February 24th, 2014
04:15 PM ET
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"Got Milk?" is one of the most recognizable ad campaigns of the past 20 years. But the iconic ads are getting axed as the industry looks for a new hook to increase milk consumption amid declining sales.

The Got Milk ad first appeared in 1994 featuring supermodel Naomi Campbell wearing a milk mustache. Over the years, the ads have featured celebrities such as Elton John, Katie Couric, Bill Clinton and David Beckham.
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Filed under: Advertising • Think


July 23rd, 2013
04:15 PM ET
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Are edible insects the food of the future? One Salt Lake City-based company thinks so. Chapul Inc. has cooked up an energy bar with an eye-popping ingredient - crickets.

Chapul Bars come in three flavors - peanut butter, chocolate and Thai - and sell for $2.99 to $3.59 each. They're made from natural ingredients such as dates, agave nectar, coconut, ginger, lime and dark chocolate. And all contain cricket flour.

"Most people don't know that crickets are a rich source of edible protein," said Patrick Crowley, 33, an environmentalist and Chapul's founder. And compared to cows and pigs, crickets are also a more environmentally-friendly source of protein, he said.

Read - This energy bar gets its kick from ... crickets

Previously:
Where to eat insects in the U.S.
Eat insects, save the world says U.N.
Get your grubs on around the world
Mexico's insects may hold the key to battling hunger
The case for eating insects
Health department bugs out over grasshopper tacos
I scream, you scream, we all scream when there are cicadas in the ice cream

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Filed under: Insects


Smithfield won't import Chinese pork
July 10th, 2013
08:00 PM ET
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Pork from China won't make its way into the U.S. if Smithfield Foods is acquired by China's Shuanghui International, Smithfield CEO Larry Pope told lawmakers Wednesday.

Shuanghui's planned purchase "will not result in any U.S. imports of food from China," Pope said in prepared remarks to the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. "This is about exporting meat products from the U.S. to China."
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