National cocoa day
December 12th, 2012
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

Cuckoo for cocoa? December 12 is National Cocoa Day!

The weather outside may be frightful, but cozying up with a mug of hot cocoa can make the day more delightful.

The Mayans are first credited with cultivating the cacao bean to brew xocoatl, an unsweetened version of modern-day hot chocolate. Much later in the 17th century, Spanish doctor Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma published the first recipe as an elixir, adding different spices to treat a number of ailments. Even President George Washington washed down his breakfast of cornmeal hoe cakes with a cup of hot chocolate.
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Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News


National lager day
December 10th, 2012
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

Raise a glass - December 10 is National Lager Day!

Despite being the most popular type of beer in the world, lager is a relative newcomer to the beer scene when compared with ale.

Ale uses the strain of yeast that ferments at the surface of the fermenting vessel (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which was also the original strain used to produce beer in ancient Babylon more than 5,000 years ago.
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Filed under: Beer • Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News • Sip


National French toast day
November 28th, 2012
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

November 28 is National French Toast Day!

Whether swimming in syrup, dusted with powered sugar or stuffed to the gills with fruit, French toast has had a recurring role on breakfast tables for many years - or possibly even centuries. One of the earliest references to the recipe dates back to 4th century Rome in the recipe book, "Apicius."

The Oxford English Dictionary traces the etymology of “French toast” to 1660 in a book called "The Accomplisht Cook," even though the recipe omitted the eggs which gives French toast the custard base that we love so much.
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Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News


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