December 5th, 2013
09:30 AM ET
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Fast food protests aren't going away.

Organizers say fast food restaurant workers in 100 U.S. cities will walk off the job Thursday, as part of a continuing push to raise wages above $15 an hour in the industry and secure the right to unionize.

The movement began with a small walkout in New York City last year and has since gathered momentum. Strikes this past August drew fast food workers in 60 cities, organizers said.

The National Restaurant Association contends that the demonstrations are a "coordinated PR campaign engineered by national labor groups," and that "relatively few restaurant workers have participated" in past demonstrations.
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Filed under: Fast Food • Human Rights • Labor Issues


November 27th, 2013
05:45 PM ET
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A Sriracha hot sauce factory is getting a chilly reception in Southern California.

A judge in Los Angeles County has ordered Sriracha maker Huy Fong Foods to suspend operations at a plant in the city of Irwindale that local residents claim has caused an overpowering odor.

Irwindale claimed in a lawsuit that the stench was causing watery eyes, sore throats and headaches, prompting complaints from dozens of residents.
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Filed under: Big Business • Business and Farming News • Hot • News


Wonder Bread is back
September 23rd, 2013
06:30 PM ET
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The iconic bread brand returned to store shelves Monday, according to reports, months after a bankruptcy judge approved the sale of Wonder, Twinkies and other assets from the now-defunct Hostess Brands.

Wonder Bread was snatched up along with most of Hostess' other bread brands by Flowers Foods for $360 million. Flowers also produces Tastykake snacks and Nature's Own bread.
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August 29th, 2013
10:30 PM ET
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Fast food workers in 60 cities across the U.S. walked off the job Thursday as they protest for higher wages.

Workers from fast food giants McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's and Yum Brands-owned KFC are calling on their employers to pay them a minimum of $15 an hour and allow them to form unions without retaliation.

Currently, the median pay for the fast food workers across the country is just over $9 an hour, or about $18,500 a year. That's roughly $4,500 lower than Census Bureau's poverty income threshold level of $23,000 for a family of four.
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