Chick-fil-A kicks antibiotics to the curb
February 11th, 2014
04:00 PM ET
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A popular American fast food restaurant wants you to "Eat mor chikin" without antibiotics.

Chick-fil-A Inc. announced plans Tuesday to use chicken raised without antibiotics in all of its restaurants within five years.

National and regional poultry suppliers are partnering with the company to stock up. Chik-fil-A wants these suppliers to collaborate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to ensure the chickens do not receive any antibiotics.
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Filed under: Antibiotics • Chick-fil-A • Fast Food • Health News


Subway removes controversial chemical from bread
February 7th, 2014
09:59 AM ET
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Take a look at ingredients for some varieties of Subway's bread and you'll find a chemical that may seem unfamiliar and hard to pronounce: azodicarbonamide.

To say this word, you would emphasize the syllable "bon" - but the attention the chemical has been getting has not been good. Besides bread, the chemical is also found in yoga mats and shoe soles to add elasticity.
But it's not long for bread at Subway: The company says it's coming out.

"We are already in the process of removing azodicarbonamide as part of our bread improvement efforts despite the fact that it is (a) USDA and FDA approved ingredient," Subway said in a statement. "The complete conversion to have this product out of the bread will be done soon."
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Filed under: Food Safety • Food Science • Health News • Subway


Hope for peanut-allergic people
January 31st, 2014
06:00 PM ET
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When you live in fear of you or your child accidentally ingesting peanut crumbs, any hope of undoing severe food allergy is welcome.

A large clinical trial published this week in the Lancet confirms what smaller studies have shown in the past: Oral immunotherapy - swallowing tiny, increasing amounts of peanut over time - has the ability to desensitize allergic individuals to peanuts.

Peanuts are one of the leading causes of food allergy reaction, and 400,000 school-aged children in the United States have this allergy, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Symptoms may occur from any contact with the peanut protein, which is why cross-contamination of foods can be very dangerous.
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Filed under: Allergies • Health News • Peanuts


The nitty-gritty on artificial sweeteners
July 15th, 2013
05:30 PM ET
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Full disclosure: A lot of journalists at CNN drink diet soda. So when we saw a new study suggesting that artificially sweetened beverages are just as bad for you as sugar-sweetened drinks, we, and our readers, bubbled over with questions.

Are artificial sweeteners used in soft drinks and foods safe? Will they make us fat? How much is too much?
Science doesn't have all the answers yet, but we spoke to researchers who had some clues.
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Rock on! Geologist drinks 2.6 billion-year-old water
June 21st, 2013
01:15 PM ET
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If you discovered water that could be millions or billions of years old, would you taste it?

Barbara Sherwood Lollar does it all the time. She's a geologist in the department of Earth Sciences at the University of Toronto, and collaborated with other researchers on analyzing water found in a Canadian mine in Timmins, Ontario. They published the findings in the journal Nature in May, showing that the water is between 1.5 and 2.6 billion years old.
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Filed under: Food History • Sip


When American colonists became cannibals
May 1st, 2013
06:00 PM ET
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The winter of 1609 to 1610 was treacherous for early American settlers. Some 240 of the 300 colonists at Jamestown, in Virginia, died during this period, called the "Starving Time," when they were under siege and had no way to get food.

Desperate times led to desperate measures. New evidence suggests that includes eating the flesh of fellow colonists who had already died.

Archaeologists revealed Wednesday their analysis of 17th century skeletal remains suggesting that settlers practiced cannibalism to survive.
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Filed under: Taboos


Allergic children often bullied with potentially fatal food
January 6th, 2013
01:15 AM ET
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In kindergarten, Owen Kellogg came home sobbing one day because another boy at school had told him that he had a peanut, and that he was going to force Owen to eat it.

Owen, now 7, is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts, said his mother, Haylee Kellogg of Cedar Hills, Utah. In reality, the taunting boy did not have a peanut, but Owen didn't know that - he just knew that eating a peanut could make him stop breathing.
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Filed under: Allergies • Health News • Peanuts


Stop touching that chicken!
June 1st, 2012
10:15 AM ET
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You've probably heard a lot about salmonella in reference to food poisoning, but the latest outbreak isn't about eating cooked animals – it's about touching live ones.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that 93 people in a total of 23 states have been infected with strains of salmonella: specifically, strains known as Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Newport, and Salmonella Lille. Of those affected, 18 patients have been hospitalized and one death may be related to the outbreak under investigation too.

A large portion – 37% – of the those infected are 10 years old or younger, according to the CDC.

Read - CDC: Salmonella outbreak tied to live poultry



Fire in the belly - evidence suggests early man may have cooked
April 2nd, 2012
03:15 PM ET
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You may be clueless about how to start a fire in the wilderness without matches or a lighter, but our ancestors may have figured it out long ago.

Scientists have uncovered evidence that humans used fire at least 1 million years ago, potentially for cooking purposes. The findings are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Michael Chazon of the University of Toronto led an investigation into the Wonderwerk Cave in South Africa. The team found burned bones and ash plant material, including grasses, leaves and twigs. The bones originated from a variety of animals: small rodents, antelopes and horselike mammals.

Read - Scientists find signs of ancient man-made fire

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Filed under: Culture • Food History • Food Science


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