February 6th, 2014
09:45 AM ET
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Despite being an object of culinary fascination around the world, balut is no beauty queen.

The 18-day-old fertilized duck egg - a snack widely eaten in the Philippines - has revolted even the most daring foodies with its carnal textures, earning it lofty rankings on many a "most disgusting/strange/terrifying food" list.

While food journalists commonly label balut as the Philippines' "much loved delicacy," in reality Filipinos are decidedly split over their nation's oft-sung snack.
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Filed under: Filipino • Taboos


January 3rd, 2014
01:00 PM ET
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In the wake of the newly-legal marijuana economy in the state of Colorado, businesses featuring pot edibles are suddenly a great big hit.
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Filed under: 420 • Marijuana • Taboos


What does the fox say? 'I don't belong in your Wal-Mart donkey meat'
January 2nd, 2014
11:30 AM ET
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Wal-Mart is recalling donkey meat in China after it was found to be contaminated with other animal products.

Wal-Mart said it was recalling the meat in Jinan, the provincial capital of Shandong. The company apologized to customers and said it would provide refunds.

State media said the product - Five Spice Donkey Meat - had been contaminated with fox meat.
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Filed under: Food Safety • Health News • Recalls • Taboos


December 26th, 2013
01:30 AM ET
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It may not fly with those imagining Santa with magical ones on Christmas Day, but a U.S. lawmaker decided to share with the world that one reindeer - in part, anyway - ended up on his plate.

"From Oslo, Merry Christmas season to my Scandinavian friends. 'Enjoyed' a meal of lutefisk, reindeer, & lefse," Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, tweeted.

Some commenters on Twitter and around the web were less than thrilled.
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Filed under: Christmas • Holidays • Taboos


June 7th, 2013
01:45 PM ET
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We arrive in the morning at the Animal Quarantine Center in Nakhon Phanom, north-east Thailand, just a few kilometers away from mountains which outline the border with Laos. The summer heat is already beating down hard and it's only 9 a.m.

But it's not humidity that hits me as I climb out of the 4WD, rather the overwhelming smell of dog urine and feces.
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May 17th, 2013
11:00 AM ET
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According to a recent U.N. report, insects could be a solution to some of the world's food and health problems. They're nutritious, eco-friendly and abundant. Many countries already consider them a staple part of their diets.

So if we're all to start consuming locusts and scorpions, we can start in Southeast Asia for guidance.
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Finding my gateway bug
May 15th, 2013
11:45 AM ET
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I ate bugs for lunch. This time it was on purpose.

By some experts' estimates, the average person inadvertently downs about one pound of insect parts a year, in foods as varied as chocolate (which can contain 60 insect components per 100 grams by law in the United States), peanut butter (30 insect parts per 100 grams) and fruit juice (up to five fruitfly eggs and one to two larvae for every 250 milliliters).

In light of the United Nations' recent plea for increased insect consumption, I decided to take the insects by the antennae and join the 2 billion people worldwide who deliberately make creepy, crawly creatures a part of their regular or special occasion diet.
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U.N: Eat insects, save the world
May 14th, 2013
10:00 AM ET
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Nicola Ruotolo is an intern in CNN's Rome bureau

Insects are the ideal food of the future, according to a new United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization report.

In "Edible insects: Future prospects for food and feed security," presented at a news conference in Rome on Monday, the group's etnomophagy experts shared compelling evidence suggesting that increased intake of insects would promote health, wealth and a cleaner environment for both rural and urban communities around the globe.

Consumption of insects like locusts, crickets or larvae is very common in parts of Asia, South America, Mexico and Africa, due in large part to their high nutritional value. Insects beat out both meat and fish in protein content and quality, and they're also rich in fiber and healthy micronutrients including copper, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium and zinc.

Insects adapt so quickly to climate change, that there would be few barriers to gathering from the wild or farming at any altitude or latitude around the planet - making them a cheap and eco-friendly food source. They also have a very low risk of transmitting disease to humans, unlike farmed beef, pork and poultry.
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May 9th, 2013
11:45 AM ET
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UPDATE: Taco Fusion briefly pulled the controversial item from its menu, but has since reversed that decision, telling Tampa's FOX 13:

The company has posted a message on its website that reads in part:

"As a country, and hell, maybe as a planet, our food processing systems are not pretty, only efficient. They are not politically correct, and certainly need work. But if you are crying out in the name of diversity, in the name of freedom, in the name of rescuing a Lion, then why don’t you cry out for Cows? Who decides which animals are worthy? If the argument is that a Lion is “Majestic” so you shouldn’t breed them for meat consumption- then what is the lesson here That only the majestic pretty girls get treated well and the ugly ones go to the slaughter pen? How pompous and idiotic does that sound?"

(WFTS) A small south Tampa restaurant is causing quite a stir over a unique item offered on their menu: lion.

For $35 dollars taco lovers can try lion, as in, the king of the jungle.

"I thought the lion was good," said patron Lee Weiner. "It didn't taste too gamey to me, similar to steak."
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