December 17th, 2012
05:15 AM ET
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The world lost an important teacher, poet and excellent, barbecue-loving soul this weekend in the form of Jake Adam York. He passed away at the age of 40 from the effects of a massive stroke, and we can't help but think about having heard him read his stunning work in person this past October at the Southern Foodways Alliance annual symposium in Oxford, Mississippi.
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Filed under: Barbecue • Content Partner • Podcast • Poetry • Radio • Southern Foodways Alliance


Israel reels in restrictions on Gaza fishermen
November 29th, 2012
11:00 AM ET
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Ahmed Ferwana has a cookout coming up, one that's been years in the making. The English teacher in Gaza City is excited because his friends will be cooking a fish they haven't been able to buy in years.

Ferwana says the taste of this fish when cooked on the grill with spices is indescribable. He added that this fish, its name is translated as locus, is also a favorite because it has fewer bones than others.

Ferwana has missed this fish because of restrictions imposed on Gaza's coastline. Citing security concerns, weapons smuggling and the desire to prevent attacks, Israel restricted Gaza's fishing to only three nautical miles from shore. That's meant a small supply of fish and high prices for years.
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Filed under: 100 Places to Eat • Middle East • Radio • Think • Travel


October 23rd, 2012
02:16 PM ET
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Editor's note: The Southern Foodways Alliance delves deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of barbecue across the United States. We've been sharing dispatches live from their 15th annual Symposium "Barbecue: An Exploration of Pitmaster, Places, Smoke, and Sauce" in Oxford, Mississippi, over the past few days. Dig in.

North Carolina writer Randall Kenan delivers the opening keynote address at the 2012 SFA symposium, a literary meditation on the importance of the hog in Southern culture. Kenan is introduced by Ted Ownby of the University of Mississippi. It's saucy.

Previously - Alton Brown on the science of cooking whole hogs



Bacon shortage - the meat of the matter
October 2nd, 2012
03:45 PM ET
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The price of bacon is about to go up. Say it isn’t so!

Though the industry warning first came out of Europe, hog farmer Diana Prichard of Michigan’s Olive Hill Farm says that it’s true here in the U.S. too.
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Filed under: Business and Farming News • Disaster • Drought • Environment • Farms • Radio


The Blaxican truck brings the best of both worlds
August 24th, 2012
11:45 AM ET
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My jaw hit the pavement the first time I saw the truck. Outside Atlanta's CNN Center was parked a FedEx-sized delivery automobile, painted with the colors of the Mexican flag and the portrait of an African-American man wearing a sombrero right smack in the middle. It bore a tagline, “The Blaxican Mexican Soul Food.”

I knew I had to find this Blaxican.

Before he was known as The Blaxican, William Turner was a Boston, Massachusetts-raised father of two who came to Atlanta in 1992 and today, like many Americans, found himself unemployed. Turner was laid off from his job as the marketing director for a non-profit religious organization a year ago.

So with that background, where did the food come in?
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Filed under: Cultural Identity • Culture • Food Trucks • Radio


May 3rd, 2012
07:00 PM ET
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It was a few minutes before 11 a.m. and Bill Adams had two things on his mind: Brunswick stew and cracklin cornbread.

To satisfy his craving for meat stew and fried pig skin, this lifelong Georgia boy made the hour-long drive Tuesday from his home in Griffin to Harold’s Barbecue in south Atlanta. When he and his friends learned this was to be Harold’s last week in business, they made plans for a final pilgrimage.

“Just wanted to stop by for one last meal,” the longtime patron said as he waited in the restaurant’s dusty parking lot for doors to open. He wasn't alone; there were about a dozen others, including a pair of Georgia State Troopers.

“It’s inevitable. Everything changes. Nothing lasts forever,” he said. “We don’t like it but we can’t stop it.”
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Pun-packed faux restaurant website whets appetite for hip-hop dishes
February 6th, 2012
04:15 PM ET
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Bad news, hungry hip-hop fans. As many of you speculated, Bon Rappetite, the world's first rap themed eatery, does not actually exist. The gloriously pun-filled website Bon-Rappetite.com is currently the closest you will get to such dishes as the Waka Flocka Flambe. That's right, if you can stop thinking about the Talib Quali-i you'll have to make it for yourself.

But take heart, because the people behind the site feel your pain. "I wish it were real" says Everett Steele a web designer and one of the co-creators of Bon-Rappetite.com.

The hip-hop fan and Atlien (that's Atlantan to the uninitiated) adds, "I have no desire to be a restaurateur but Ludacris, if you are listening, Usher, Drake come down to Atlanta, give me whatever is in that case or what you keep in that room and I will build a restaurant around it."
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Pancakes and politics – the finer points of the diner meet and greet
January 9th, 2012
05:30 PM ET
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Steve Kastenbaum is a CNN Radio National Correspondent, currently covering the New Hampshire primary. He previously wrote about the mystique of the Brooklyn bagel.

A presidential candidate wouldn’t dare campaign in New Hampshire without making a stop at a diner. Sometimes they’ll hit several in one day. As they look over the menu to figure out what suits their tastes, patrons size up the presidential candidates here in the same way.

The Red Arrow Diner sits on a side street in the heart of downtown Manchester. The historic landmark has been here since 1923. There’s almost always a wait for a seat. The corned beef hash and the fried haddock sandwich are favorites among the locals and first timers struggle to eat every bite of the generous tall stack of pancakes.

But they also serve politics here and that’s the real draw. The walls of this old diner are lined with photographs of just about every presidential candidate who ran for office over the past few years, Republican and Democrat.

Click to listen to the CNN Radio podcast:
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Filed under: Campaign Trail • Diners • New England • Radio • Restaurants


At a Des Moines diner, voters get to the meat of the matter
January 2nd, 2012
07:15 PM ET
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Lisa Desjardins is the host of American Sauce. Click to listen to the CNN Radio podcast and listen to more American Sauce on Political Ticker:

Des Moines (CNN) – Both campaign essential and political cliché, the diner is again rising to prominence in the last days before the Iowa caucuses. Candidates have been crawling (almost literally, due to space concerns) all over the roadside fixtures.

But it is in the absence of candidates that Iowa voters may give you the most sincere reviews of both food and politics.

"I got the ham," said Chris Aldinger. "Iowa ham." Aldinger ate the "Shebang," an egg and ham special, at Des Moines' Drake Diner, a 50s-style restaurant next to the university of the same name.

In the diners of Iowa, pork is essential. Bacon, ham, sausage, tenderloin, barbecue, ribs and sandwiches are just the basics.
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Filed under: Campaign Trail • Diners • News • Radio • Restaurants


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