August 3rd, 2011
05:20 PM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing, as is the Reader Challenge.

When folks are using sidewalks as griddles and baking biscuits in their cars, you know you've got a heat wave on your (sweaty) hands. Take a tip from the folks at Knox who published "Dainty Desserts for Dainty People" way back in 1915. They didn't need any newfangled plug-in freezers or schmancy ice cream gizmos to keep cool in the middle of a blistering summer - just a block of ice in a chest, or crushed ice mixed with rock salt.

Where'd the ice come from without a home freezer? Let's not get too hung up on the details (a strapping delivery gent would come around with a wagon full of blocks and some tongs) when there are brains to be frozen and tongues to be tantalized.

Here's your assignment, should you choose to accept it.
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June 15th, 2011
09:05 AM ET
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There are places in this very country where - and I'm not saying this is right or wrong - people think it's a fine idea to put raisins or pineapple in their cole slaw. There are other places where - and I'm not saying this is right or wrong (though it's totally right) - that such behavior would be met with public shunnings and possibly legal action, were they to inflict such an abomination upon the unsuspecting public.

After all, there is only one acceptable way to make cole slaw: the way you ate it growing up.
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Filed under: Books • Cole Slaw • Dishes • Make • Recipes • Sides • Staples • Vintage Cookbook Vault • Vintage Cookbooks


The Price of New York City dining
April 25th, 2011
09:00 PM ET
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A reading from the works of noted gourmands Vincent and Mary Price, from their 1965 cookbook "A Treasury of Great Recipes":

"If there is one restaurant that epitomizes New York today it is The Four Seasons. Sophisticated, urbane, expensive, its stark geometry reflects that city of skyscrapers. Nature is permitted to intrude, as it does on the city itself, in seasonal paintings that scarcely affect the austere architecture. New Yorkers who dine at The Four Seasons know which season has arrived by the plants in the window baskets. Who needs a calendar?"

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April 24th, 2011
03:00 PM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing.

The Easter bunny's come and gone, the kids are crashed out in a post-candy coma and you - you just might dig a little pick-me-up. Or a chill-me-out. Whichever - you're of legal drinking age, Lent's come to an end and you might have a few extra unboiled eggs hanging out in the fridge.
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Dean Martin's Bourbon Burgers
April 1st, 2011
11:00 AM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing.

Well, ain't that a kick in the palate? Some of the country may be getting socked with snow, but the lack of a grill wouldn't have gotten in ol' Dino's way if he wanted a burger. No siree. And he didn't need no fancy-schmancy hardwood lump charcoal, grass-fed heirloom bison, artisanal mustard, or even a bun for that matter.

Per his recipe from The Celebrity Cookbook, edited by Ms Dinah Shore in 1996, this Rat Packer needed little more than a pan, a pinch of salt, and a shot of Kentucky's finest when he wanted to get his beef on.
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Richard Simmons holding cake in a snow globe
March 30th, 2011
11:15 AM ET
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Yes. That is diet and fitness guru Richard Simmons holding a slice of a cake in a pasted-up snow globe. There's a reason for this. We'll share it soon, but for now, just...enjoy. Be with it. Let it calm you.

And by the way, he doesn't think you should make fat jokes.



Vintage Cookbook Vault: A "stripper housewife" brings the giggles and jiggles
March 7th, 2011
04:00 PM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing.

Shake that aspic!

We're always thoroughly delighted when readers take us up on our vintage recipe challenges. Y'all came through with the Frank and Corn Crown. While the Aspic supper salad challenge garnered fewer entries, boy did they stand out.

Meet The Stripper Housewife a.k.a. burlesque performer Peekaboo Pointe. Not only is she the "Fastest Tassel-Twirler from East to West," - she's not afraid of a little bit of cold beef tongue.
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Vintage Cookbook Vault: Aspic supper salad challenge
February 28th, 2011
04:15 PM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing.

Y'all know we appreciate the absolute beans out of you, right? When we posted the Frank and Corn Crown recipe, along with a tossed gauntlet to document your efforts at home, we were downright giddy when reader Sarah picked it up - and deftly so.

Giddy turned to gobsmacked when we realized that she wasn't the only one. So – as long as we can keep finding fun, festive vintage recipes, once a week we'll post one and double-dog-dare our readers to blog about their efforts - with snapshots of the final product. Leave a link in the comments and we'll show 'em off.
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Vintage Cookbook Vault: Double dog dare part deux
February 25th, 2011
11:00 AM ET
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The Vintage Cookbook Vault highlights recipes from my insane stash of books and pamphlets from the early 20th century onward. It's a semi-regular thing.

Remember aaallll the way back to a few weeks ago when we posted a righteous recipe for a Frank and Corn Crown from the 1965 Better Homes and Gardens Meat Cook Book, and Sarah of all.of.my.dirty.little.secrets took up our challenge to craft one of her own at home?
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