5@5 - How to get started with preserving food
June 10th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Sherri Brooks Vinton is the author of “Put ‘em Up!” and “Put ‘em Up! Fruit.” When she’s not at the stove, she’s on the road teaching fellow eaters how to find, cook and preserve local, seasonal, farm friendly food. To find out more, visit sherribrooksvinton.com

“That was so EASY!”

It’s the number one comment I hear at the end of my food preservation classes. Canning, fermenting, drying - there are a lot of ways to preserve your own food at home and the techniques are much simpler than you think. Getting started is probably the hardest part; the process is simple and the equipment needs are, in most cases, minimal.

So if you’ve been thinking about putting up a little something, let this be your season.

My Top Five Food Preserving Questions: Sherri Brooks Vinton
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Make • Pickles • Recipes • Think


5@5 - Why printed cookbooks still matter
May 28th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Kaitlyn Goalen is the former National Edition editor of Tasting Table and one of the driving forces behind Short Stack Editions. Follow her on Twitter @kaitgoalen.

For most of my career, I’ve been writing about food for digital publications. Twitter, Instagram, cat GIFs (pronounced “jif,” we now know) and endless e-mails are all part of my daily routine.

But when it comes to my own culinary reading list, a surprisingly heavy percentage is dedicated to cookbooks. Not apps, not e-books. Physical printed cookbooks. It was a realization that recently led me to take a break from the digital landscape and launch a printed cookbook series called Short Stack.

Why, some may ask, when you can just as easily find recipes online and for free? Here are five answers to that very question.

Five Reasons to Care About Cookbooks in a Digital Age: Kaitlyn Goalen
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Cookbooks • Culture • Think


5@5 - Host a panic-free Mother's Day brunch
May 9th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

This Sunday is Mother's Day, but you knew that. The card is in the mail, the bouquet is pre-ordered, the brunch reservation is in the book...

Right?

If the holiday did just happen to slip your mind, fret not: Elizabeth Blau of Honey Salt restaurant in Las Vegas has some tips on showing Mom you care the homemade way - all while keeping your sanity intact.

Five Stress-Reducing Tips for Mother's Day Brunch: Elizabeth Blau
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Events • Holidays • Mother's Day • Mother's Day • Think


5@5 - How to bring home a taste of your travels
May 7th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Matt Gross is the author of the new memoir "The Turk Who Loved Apples." Follow him on Twitter @worldmattworld.

For most of the past decade, I was on the road. I was a travel writer, working primarily for the New York Times (where I was the Frugal Traveler), and also for several other publications, including Saveur and Afar magazines. As I ranged from Buenos Aires to Gdansk to Chongqing, I was so hungry for the experience of new, great food that I quickly realized I couldn't just return to my nominal home in Brooklyn, without bringing back a taste of my adventures.

Flouting U.S. Customs regulations (or, really, just not bothering to find out what they might be) I sought out these five essential ingredients that travel well, last long and offer up pungent memories of far-flung lands.

Five Essential Foods to "Smuggle" Home: Matt Gross
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 100 Places to Eat • 5@5 • Think • Travel


5@5 - Sap happy! Unexpected uses for maple syrup
April 16th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Jacob Griffin doesn't want maple syrup to be stuck as a pancake staple; there's a lot more sweetness to tap.

Griffin is the chef at The Farm Stand Cafe at Madava Farms, an organic maple farm in New York’s Hudson Valley that is the home of Crown Maple Syrup.

Five Unlikely Uses for Real Maple Syrup: Jacob Griffin
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Make • Recipes • Think


5@5 - How to hire a great staff
April 5th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Dan Latimer is the general manager of HUSK Restaurant in Charleston, South Carolina. HUSK is the second restaurant under the helm of James Beard Award-winning Chef Sean Brock and is often regarded as one of the best restaurants in America.

Hiring a team is one of the most integral points in a restaurant manager’s life; a well-thought-out and executed regiment in hiring can save countless hours of “managing” in the future. I remember waaay back in school learning about the Marriott Management Philosophy on hiring. There were many snippets, but the one that has stayed with me the most is: “If you don’t hire the right people, we can never make anything out of them."

One of the biggest keys to success in hiring is understanding the culture of your company and finding people who fit that culture. I have encountered many candidates who had plenty of experience and knowledge, but just not the right personality. If we brought that person in, we would be doing ourselves - and that person - a disservice (and this is the service industry after all).

The environment during an interview is important to keep in mind. We all have to remember that every potential team member is also a potential guest. Even if they aren’t the right fit for an employee, they are still the right fit for a guest. We try to make everyone feel welcome and warm; it is hospitality no matter what the outcome might be.

I have highlighted key aspects of this nuanced practice in the following five points. Remember, there was a lot more in the stockpot when I began. And, I am not going to give you all my secrets because then all of my future candidates would have a leg up on me.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Restaurants • Sean Brock • Service • Think


5@5 - Blend your way to milkshake perfection
April 3rd, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Since the Harlem Shake has jumped the shark, let’s get back to a shake that really matters - we're talking about the good ol’ fashioned milkshake.

Mark Robert Turner is here to make the transition a smooth one. Turner is the Operations Manager - and resident milkshake magician - of Bareburger, a micro-chain of organic burger restaurants.

If you don’t own a blender, you can use an immersion or stick blender, which works just as effectively. If you don’t have either one of those, grab a stainless steel bowl and a whisk; you should never deny yourself a milkshake because you don’t have the right equipment.

Five Tips To Make a Marvelous Milkshake: Mark Robert Turner
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Ice Cream • Make • Recipes • Sweet • Think


5@5 - Busting barbecue myths
April 1st, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Daniel Vaughn may be the most envied man in America right now. Not only is his book "The Prophets of Smoked Meat: A Journey Through Texas Barbecue" coming out next month as the debut title in the Anthony Bourdain Books line, he's also taking up a post as the barbecue editor of Texas Monthly magazine. It's the first position of its kind in the country, and the 35-year-old Ohio-born Vaughn left his job as an architect to pursue his fiery passion for smoked meat full time.

The self-proclaimed "BBQ snob" has eaten at over 600 barbecue joints across the nation. He makes it his business to sniff out the best of the best and help his carnivorous brethren avoid potential pitfalls along the way with reviews on his website Full Custom Gospel BBQ.

As such, Mr. Vaughn has a bone to pick with some commonly-held barbecue beliefs.

Five Barbecue Myths That Should Be Dispelled: Daniel Vaughn
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Barbecue • Texas • Think


5@5 - How to modernize your Seder
March 25th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Tradition!

The week-long Passover holiday kicks off at sundown tonight with the ritual Seder meal. The centerpiece of the feast is the Seder plate, brimming with symbolic foods that commemorate the exodus of Israelites from slavery in Egypt. The plate includes:

  • a lamb shankbone
  • a roasted, hard-boiled egg
  • a vegetable, usually parsley, dipped in salt water
  • charoset/haroset, a sweet mixture of apples, nuts, wine and spices
  • a bitter vegetable, like romaine lettuce

Founder Nick Wiseman and chef Barry Koslow of DGS Delicatessen in Washington, D.C., have a few tips to help freshen up the traditional Passover Seder menu without upsetting your bubbe too much.

Five Ways to Modernize Your Seder: Barry Koslow
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Holidays • Passover • Passover • Think


Pinterest
Archive
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
| Part of