5@5 - What chefs stress out about
June 9th, 2014
05:00 AM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Chefs have a lot on their plates, from food costs and health inspections to sourcing ethically produced ingredients and making sure to see their family every once in a while. They're an anxious bunch, but chances are that diners will never see anything beyond a perfectly arranged plate and a sweat-free forehead. Restaurants are as much in the business of theater as they are in dining.

Todd Wiss knows what it takes to keep the seams from showing to the customers. As the executive chef of Firefly in Washington, D.C., he has made a mission of serving seasonal, sustainable, local food (often harvested from just a few feet above the restaurant), often with diners' dietary restrictions in mind. But there's an awful lot of work that goes into making things at this neighborhood favorite - or any restaurant - seem cool as a cucumber, even when the heat is on.

5 things that make chefs anxious (that diners never see): Todd Wiss
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Chefs • Dietary Restrictions • Gluten-free • Social Media • Think


5@5 - The enduring appeal of the Old-Fashioned
June 3rd, 2014
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's note: Robert O. Simonson is the author of "The Old Fashioned" and he writes about cocktails, spirits and bar culture for The New York Times as well as GQ, Wine Enthusiast, Wine Advocate, Imbibe, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn, and Time Out New York.

The thing to keep in mind about the Old-Fashioned - and the reason this drink keeps people fascinated, satisfied and frequently argumentative - is that it’s not just a great cocktail but that it’s also the cocktail. That is, it follows to the letter the blueprint for a category of drink - spirit, bitters, water, sugar - that was established more than two centuries ago.

That recipe structure, while as sturdy as steel, also happens to be endlessly welcoming of interpretation, embracing spirits well beyond the de rigueur whiskey. In fact, for a short period of time in the late-19th-century and early 20th century, a number of old cocktail books treated the Old-Fashioned not as a single drink, but as a branch of cocktails. (Gin Old-Fashioned, Brandy Old-Fashioned, etc.)

Today’s mixologists approach the drink with much the same mix of reverence and imagination, perfecting their ultimate expression of the classic drink with one hand, while messing around with the model with the other. The profit of this twin-minded attitude is that many of today’s cocktail menus include a classic Old-Fashioned for the purists and, for the curious, an in-house version that switches out the base spirit, the sweetener, the bitters and sometimes all three.

So, it you ever find yourself growing tired of the same old Bourbon or Rye Old-Fashioned (why this would happen, we can’t fathom), there are options. Try giving one of these differently spiritous iterations a spin.

5 Old-Fashioned variations for every spirit: Robert O. Simonson
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Booze Books • Cocktail Recipes • Sip • Spirits • Think


5@5 - Practically free ingredients
May 7th, 2014
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's note: Brothers Matt Lee and Ted Lee recently both hosted and cooked at the James Beard Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards ceremony. Their latest book, "The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen" won an International Association of Culinary Professionals award in the American cookbooks category, and the duo are about to launch Cookbook Boot Camp, a two-day intensive workshop for professional chefs and others eager to publish cookbooks of quality.

Like many regions of the country, South Carolina's Lowcountry experienced a cold, hard winter that seemed like it would never end. And it wreaked more than a bit of havoc on the ingredients we forage for - and typically find abundant - come Spring. Something about their being less plentiful made us realize how much we love them and wish they had a bigger platform, a more prominent venue, leagues more supporters.

It’s exciting to have farmers in the South digging deep into seed banks, finding heirloom grains and legumes that haven’t been tasted for decades. But we’d also like to shine a light on these five naturalized plant ingredients that already grow in abundance and are often overlooked. So this is a call to action to chefs in the South - and elsewhere - to get hip to the brilliance of FREE FOOD.

5 practically free ingredients we wish more Southern chefs would use: Matt Lee and Ted Lee
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Foraging • Local Food • Scorpacciata • Southern • Spring Vegetables • Think • Vegetables


5@5 - Easy vegan staples to get you started
March 19th, 2014
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's note: Angela Liddon is the writer, photographer, and recipe developer for Oh She Glows, the web’s destination for healthy vegan recipes. Her first cookbook, The "Oh She Glows Cookbook" was released this month. She also has an M.S. in Social-Personality Psychology and enjoys helping others find happiness and health through a plant-based diet.

When I first shifted to a vegan diet, I bought all of those packaged and highly processed mock meat and dairy products that I thought I was supposed to buy. "Isn’t this what vegans do?" I thought as I stuffed my mock turkey slices into the cart.

The problem? My energy wasn’t as supercharged as I hoped it would be on a vegan diet. Surprise, surprise, once I rid my diet of all of these imitation products filled with a million unpronounceable ingredients the only other option was to embrace a whole foods diet and get busy in my kitchen. Yes, I had to suck it up and teach myself how to cook real food. Or bust.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Make • Recipes • Think • Vegan • Vegetarian


5@5 - More Southern dishes that deserve a comeback
November 13th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

A while back, chef John Currence stopped by Eatocracy to share his list of five Southern dishes that deserve a comeback. Thing is, when a cuisine's bench is that wide and that deep, there are plenty more options to be put into play.

Levon Wallace is the Executive Chef at Proof on Main in Louisville, Kentucky. While he was Born in East Los Angeles, as his Twitter bio declares, "My heart belongs to the South."

This devotion extends to the region's dishes.

"These recipes are classics: they're the people's recipes," Wallace says. "Southern food as a whole is the people's food, really basic, satisfying stuff. There is no reason why these recipes shouldn't be something we're doing all the time. They're not some big, crazy, complicated undertaking with hundreds of ingredients; they're classics, with little updates to really up the ante on your Southern food game."

Lay 'em on us, Levon.

Five more Southern dishes that deserve a comeback: Levon Wallace
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Make • Recipes • Southern • Tailgating • Think


November 5th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman have been friends since childhood - that is after the two of them got past the habit of badmouthing each other every time their rival Catholic schools met on the playing field. Though the duo were born and raised in Memphis, both come from large, Italian-American families that ritualize meals and celebrate their culinary heritage.

The two 2013 Food & Wine Best New Chefs preserve and progress their dual Southern/Italian culture at their restaurants Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen and Hog & Hominy. Their recently-published cookbook, "Collards and Carbonara" shares many of the techniques and recipes, so their ever-growing fan base can explore this soulful, seasonal meld at home.

And you can't nail the Italian half of the equation without mastering fresh pasta. Here are five shapes that - with a little practice - may make you say "Ciao!" to the boxed stuff for good.

Five classic pasta shapes to make at home: Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Italian • Make • Pasta • Recipes • Staples • Think


5@5 - It's all (biscuits) and gravy, baby
October 23rd, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe. If  you need to get into the biscuit-making mood, head on over to our handy-dandy biscuit tutorial: The biscuit recipe that can't be beat.

Biscuits are a way to transport Southerners and non-Southerners alike back into a, if not their, memaw's kitchen. And, a good biscuit needs little more than some butter or jam.

That’s definitely the case at Tupelo Honey Cafe in Asheville, North Carolina, where executive chef Brian Sonoskus puts biscuits on every table - no matter the time of day.

Below, Chef Sonoskus smothers the home cook with bells and whistles for the flaky staple.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Biscuits • Dishes • Recipes • Think


5@5 - Barbecue sides get a boost
September 30th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Whether you go with pulled pork, brisket or ribs, every fall barbecue is going to need some complementary side dishes.

Christopher Kostow from the acclaimed The Restaurant at Meadowood in St. Helena, California, offers all the fixins' - with a little extra flair.

How to Elevate Barbecue Side Dishes: Christopher Kostow
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Barbecue • Recipes • Think


5@5 - Low-alcohol bottles for your summer bar
July 30th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Christophe Hille and Chris Ronis are the chief operating officer and managing partner, respectively, of Northern Spy Food Co. in New York City. Follow them on Twitter @nothernspyfood.

Borrowing from that old saw, "If life gives you lemons, make lemonade," we say, "When the community board denies you a full liquor license, make aperitif cocktails."

We discovered a whole world of crafty and delightful drinks that are stronger and weirder than wine, perfect for creating cocktails or enjoying alone. Most are variations on a theme: a base of wine, fortified with grape spirits or brandy to reach 15-20% alcohol by volume and flavored with an array of complex and highly-guarded herbs, spices, fruits and aging regimes.

Some, such as sherries, are their own category of wine, with long-established rules governing grape varieties, region of production and classification. To find these beverages, wander to where your local liquor store keeps the bottles that seem to belong in your grandma's booze cupboard. Below are a few of our favorites and cocktail recipes to go with them.
FULL POST



Recent comments
Pinterest
Archive
July 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
| Part of