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12:45 PM ET, July 11th, 2012
Barbecue Digest: It's a pig, not a fruit

Editor's note: All summer long, the Southern Foodways Alliance will be delving deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain...

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11:00 AM ET, June 22nd, 2012
Barbecue Digest: Bar-B-Que buffet

Editor's note: All summer long, the Southern Foodways Alliance will be delving deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain...

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01:00 PM ET, June 18th, 2012
Take a moment to stare at some barbecue

Barbecue means a lot of things to a lot of people. It brings together folks of all faiths, ethnicities, backgrounds...

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04:15 PM ET, March 5th, 2012
Lick the Screen - Boiled peanuts

This is a dish of boiled peanuts. You love them, you hate them, or you just haven't had them; they...

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04:00 PM ET, December 20th, 2011
Lick the Screen - Behold the s'moreo!

I've never liked s'mores and it's not for lack of effort. I grew up with the classic version of the...

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12:30 AM ET, March 19th, 2014

Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

The news that Prosecco outsold Champagne - 307 million bottles worldwide compared with 304 million - may flabbergast some fizz fans, but it’s really no surprise. Prosecco is as hot as a cold, sparkling white wine can be, with sales in 2013 up more than 24% over 2012.
 
That 307 million stat, by the way, came from OVSE, an Italian wine “observatory” (essentially an industry research group, though you have to like the idea of white-coated scientists spending their time watching bottles of Prosecco through massive mountaintop telescopes), so perhaps one should take it with a grain of salt. Regardless, it’s hard to argue with Prosecco’s overall appeal.
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Filed under: Bubbly • Content Partner • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine

 
11:30 AM ET, March 14th, 2014

Christopher Dawson is a producer with CNN Special Projects and works with CNN's Impact Your World team. Video by Greg Bowman, Eatocracy's go-to beer guy.

If that last beer made you feel a little warm and fuzzy inside, it could be because you just did some good. You may have just donated to a charity, just by buying a drink.

I first noticed this philanthropy trend while enjoying a new limited release IPA from Sweetwater Brewery called Second Helping. The name implies having more, and the compelling flavoring of juniper berries and chocolate malts had already sold me on that proposition.

But then I read the beer’s label and learned that it was crafted to benefit a charity called The Giving Kitchen, which helps people in the food industry going through hard times. This initiative was inspired by Atlanta chef Ryan Hidinger, who brought the Atlanta restaurant community together when he fought and ultimately lost his battle with cancer. His wife and friends decided to take the generous funds that were raised to help Ryan and pay it forward by creating this charity. I admit that it got me when I read that the juniper berries were added for Ryan, because he so enjoyed cooking with them.
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Filed under: Bars • Beer • Charity • Sip • St. Patrick's Day

 
03:00 PM ET, March 13th, 2014

Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

Recently - and just in time for St. Patrick’s Day - Nerdwallet.com released a study on the cheapest cities for beer drinkers. Based on some fancy math that involves a six-pack of Heineken, median incomes, beer tax and beer demand, the site determined that Washington, DC, is the least expensive city for beer drinkers. (If you’re earning the median income, you could buy more than 30,000 Heinekens a year!) Of course, now you want to know the most expensive city for beer drinkers; according to Nerdwallet, that’s Chicago.
  
Now you know where your income is best spent on Heineken. Also good to know for St. Patrick’s Day are these outrageously good new breweries around the country, specializing in excellent beers, stouts and ales. Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
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Filed under: Bars • Beer • Content Partner • Food and Wine • Holidays • Sip • St. Patrick's Day

 
03:45 PM ET, March 12th, 2014

The leaves that go into a cup of Ceylon tea play a surprisingly complex role in the history of Sri Lanka.

It started with a single camellia sinesis plant brought from China in 1824 by the British, who had colonized the island then known as Ceylon in 1801.
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Filed under: India • Sip • Tea • Travel

 
01:00 AM ET, March 11th, 2014

Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

News last week that the powers that be in Tuscany’s Chianti Classico region have created a new, super-duper designation for the region’s wines - Chianti Classico "Gran Selezione" - got me thinking. I’ve got no problem at all with a special category of top-end Chianti Classico (about 10 percent of the region’s wines will qualify); in fact, I think life would be excellent if various of my relatives and friends took it upon themselves to buy me cases of high-end Chianti. Why not? But I do have to admit: My real affection for Chianti has more to do with the fact that so many of the region’s affordable wines are so appealing.
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Filed under: Content Partner • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine

 
05:00 PM ET, March 7th, 2014

Two women's beer organizations, the Pink Boots Society from the United States and Project Venus from the United Kingdom, have teamed up to create a global, all-female brew day on March 8 in order to raise awareness of women in the industry.

International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day will allow women from more than 60 breweries around the world to create their own version of the collaborative, girl-powered recipe called Unite Pale Ale.

“The beauty of the recipe is that it still leaves room for creativity and uniqueness to the individual brewsters,” says Denise Ratfield, of the Pink Boots Society and San Diego-based Stone Brewing Co. (Industry jargon uses brewster as the feminine form of brewer.)

Sophie de Ronde, head brewer of Brentwood Brewing Company in Chelmsford, England, came up with the idea that has since spread stateside with the help of Ratfield and the Pink Boots Society.

“Our goal is to continue to empower women, educate them so that the future of craft beer will see a host of talented, capable women that will bring innovation to the industry,” Ratfield says. "We are passionate and feel the need to take charge of our own professional destiny."
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Filed under: Beer • Bowman on Beer • Sip

 
12:00 PM ET, March 4th, 2014

The Scottish Highlands and Speyside region.

The back roads of Kentucky and Tennessee.

Suntory's Yamazaki Distillery and Hakushu "forest distillery."

For seekers of premium malts, these are some of the touchstones of whiskey travel.

Now a new whiskey region is laying claim to world-class status.
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Filed under: Business and Farming News • Sip • Spirits

 
12:00 PM ET, February 28th, 2014

Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

I had the good fortune last week to be in California for Premiere Napa Valley, a glitzy shindig for which the valley’s top wineries produce special, one-off cuvées to help fund the Napa Valley Vintners (the local trade association). Usually five or 10 cases, but sometimes up to a full barrel, these cuvées are then auctioned off to wine shop owners and the like for, ideally, huge heaps of cash. Nothing is ever cheap at this event, and at this year’s auction—which demolished previous records for revenue—some things were very, very expensive.

Take, for instance, the top lot: five cases of wine from the beloved-by-billionaires cult–Cab favorite Scarecrow. It sold for $260,000. That’s about more than four grand a bottle, give or take. Or, you know, for normal people, a house.
 
However: It should be said that despite the glow given off by extravaganzas like this one, Napa Valley does produce some very good wines that are also, actually, affordable. People tend to forget that fact in their concentration on the region’s famed Cabernets, but it’s well-worth remembering.

Here, for those of us (wine writers included) who could no more spend four thousand bucks on a bottle of wine than we could fly to the moon on the backs of magical swans, some ideal Napa bargains.
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Filed under: Content Partner • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine

 
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