Dining on feral swine
July 22nd, 2013
02:00 PM ET
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Editor's note: The Southern Foodways Alliance delves deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of Southern food. Today's contributor Abigail Greenbaum received her MFA at the University of Mississippi and now teaches English and writing at Berry College in Georgia. Follow her on Twitter @AbigailGreenb.

People from Atlanta call Tommy Haskins several times a week, begging him to sell them feral hog. “It isn’t legal to sell the hogs we hunt,” he tells them. “But you can come down to Twiggs County and shoot one.” In order to sell meat to the general public in Georgia, the animal must arrive alive at an approved processing facility, and be inspected prior to slaughter.

Feral swine eat a low-fat diet. Most are too lean to use for making bacon, even the 160-pound hogs that Haskins and his clients bring down. Folks searching for feral hog are often immigrants from Vietnam, where lean pork is wrapped with banana leaves in a dish called gio lua.

Local food advocates also clamor for field-shot pork. Afield: A Chef’s Guide to Preparing and Cooking Wild Game and Fish, written by the Texas hunter and chef Jesse Griffiths, includes recipes for smothered wild boar chops with anise brine and wild boar rillettes. Haskins doesn’t bother with anise brine. He prefers hickory-smoked hams, basted with apple juice.

On his property southeast of Macon, Haskins rarely goes a day without glimpsing hogs, which he calls “piney woods rooters.” These hogs have mixed pedigrees. Some may have descended from Spanish swine introduced in the 1500s. Others are released or escaped domestic pigs that bred with Eurasian wild boars that were imported for hunting.
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October 9th, 2012
10:45 AM ET
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Bizarre Foods host Andrew Zimmern traveled to Bentonville, Arkansas to sample tamales, gumbo, stew and other dishes all made with a little something extra - squirrel meat.
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Filed under: Andrew Zimmern • Hunting • Ingredients • Meat • Squirrel


'These chorizos are huge!' – how Paul Ryan's sausage gets made
October 8th, 2012
06:00 PM ET
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Ask, and you shall receive. We implored CNN Political Producer Shawna Shepherd to suss out the secrets of vice presidential candidate and avid hunter Paul Ryan's much-vaunted homemade venison sausage, and goodness, did she deliver.

According to Sunday's pool report, the secret to Ryan's venison sausage is spices from Tenuta's Deli ("A Kenosha Tradition Since 1950!") where he spoke with reporters while purchasing supplies for this year's haul.
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On the hunt for a shooting and fishing vacation
October 4th, 2012
10:30 AM ET
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Hunting and fishing are on the rise for the first time in decades.

While hunting has always been a way for self-sufficient people to feed their families in a poor economy, another theory for its current popularity is that it can also be an affordable "staycation" for people trying to spend less on their vacations.

Steven Rinella, host of "Meat Eater" on the Sportsman Channel and the author of a just released hunting tome of the same name, says there's more to it. As an increasing number of Americans become interested in where their food comes from and want to play a part in making it, Rinella says that many are newly compelled to try killing their own meat.
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Filed under: Animal Rights • Fishing • Food Politics • Hunting • Travel


5@5 - Why hunting your own dinner is an ethical way to eat
July 2nd, 2012
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Editor's Note: Lily Raff McCaulou is an award-winning journalist, Knight-Wallace Fellowship recipient and a columnist for The Bulletin in Bend, Oregon. Her first book, "Call of the Mild: Learning to Hunt My Own Dinner" was published in June.

Growing up, I didn’t know anyone who hunted. Hunters, I figured, were probably just barbaric gun nuts. Then, eight years ago, I moved from Manhattan to rural Oregon, to write for a small newspaper. My perspective shifted when I began interviewing hunters for my articles and realized that although I had long considered myself an environmentalist, these hunters – most of whom scoffed at the “E” word – were more knowledgeable and thoughtful about animals and nature than I was.

Eventually, I decided to buy a gun and join them. But don’t worry, I’m still an environmentalist, loud and proud.

Five Reasons Why Hunting a Wild Animal Makes an Ethical Dinner: Lily Raff McCaulou

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Filed under: 5@5 • Animal Rights • Food Politics • Hunting • Path to the Plate • Think


March 21st, 2012
04:00 PM ET
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If you think of hunters as men in camouflage, you better think again.

Eatocracy associate editor Sarah LeTrent and CNN's Suzanne Malveaux discuss how "The Hunger Games" bucks the conventional idea of people who hunt.

Watch Eatocracy on CNN Newsroom every Wednesday at 12:45 ET.



'The Hunger Games' bucks hunter stereotypes
March 16th, 2012
09:30 AM ET
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“Within a few minutes, I spot a rabbit and make my first kill with the bow and arrow. It’s not my usual clean shot through the eye, but I’ll take it,” says the narrator in “The Hunger Games.”

“The Hunger Games” is the wildly popular trilogy of dystopian novels by Suzanne Collins – and the narrator is not a stereotypical camouflage-clad hunter; she’s a 16-year-old girl.

The eagerly anticipated first film of the series hits theaters on March 23, and with the growing popularity of protagonist Katniss Everdeen, aims to shoot down conventional ideas of people who hunt.
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Filed under: Books • Columns • Favorites • Hunting • Make • Movies • Recipes • Think


5@5 - Five ways to eat more duck
March 8th, 2012
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Hank Shaw is the blogger behind Hunter Angler Gardener Cook and the author of "Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast."

"I think daily about new ways to cook and eat anything that walks, flies, swims, crawls, skitters, jumps – or grows," Shaw writes.

"Honest food is what I’m seeking. Nothing packaged, nothing in a box, nothing wrapped in plastic. I eat meat, and I’m not keen on factory farms, so I either hunt it myself or buy it from real people who raise animals humanely."

For Shaw, one food that fits his "honest food" bill is duck.

Five times the quack, five times the yum.

Five Ways to Eat More Duck: Hank Shaw
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Filed under: 5@5 • Bite • Duck • Hunting • Ingredients • Meat • Think


Chef Dan Barber: Killing your own food is an incontestably moral act
June 2nd, 2011
09:30 AM ET
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Last month, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told the 847 friends on his private Facebook page that he had "just killed a pig and a goat" - to eat.

Horrifying? Why? asks Dan Barber, chef and co-owner of the farm-to-table restaurant Blue Hill in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, New York. That Zuckerberg, the 27-year-old Internet billionaire, has made killing any meat he eats this year's personal goal is "an incontestably moral act," Barber says. He's slaughtered animals for meat himself. "I do think it's important for anyone who wants to be conscious of their food and where it comes from," he says.
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Chefs with Issues • Dan Barber • Food Politics • Hunting • Local Food • Sustainability • Think


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