'Clean eating' defined
January 23rd, 2014
03:15 PM ET
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Editor's note: Cynthia Sass is a registered dietitian with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health, and the author of "S.A.S.S! Yourself Slim: Conquer Cravings, Drop Pounds and Lose Inches." Connect with Cynthia on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

The first time I heard the word "clean" in relation to food was way back in the mid-1990s. I attended a conference about supermarket trends, and learned that grocery chains were starting to "clean up" store brand ingredient lists by removing unrecognizable terms.

Back then, this move was considered controversial, because it involved doing away with added nutrients, listed by their technical, non-household names (like pantothenic acid, a B vitamin), as well as eliminating preservatives, which meant short shelf lives (e.g., would consumers really want bread that gets hard or moldy within a few days?).
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Food: it's good for what ails ya
August 30th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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Can't sleep? Got the PMS blues? Before you open your medicine cabinet, step into your kitchen.

"Real, whole, fresh food is the most powerful drug on the planet," says the author of "The Blood Sugar Solution" cookbook, Dr. Mark Hyman. "It regulates every biological function of your body." In fact, recent research suggests not only what to eat but when to eat it for maximum benefit. Check out the latest smart food fixes.

Problem: I'm bloated

Food fix #1: Dig in to juicy fruits and vegetables
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Broccoli may be your arthritis-fighting friend
August 28th, 2013
12:30 PM ET
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Even if you're not a fan of broccoli, your joints may be.

Nutritionists have rhapsodized about the various benefits of broccoli — the cruciferous vegetable is stuffed with vitamins A, B, K, C, as well as nutrients such as potassium, zinc and fiber — and arthritis sufferers may soon join them.

Along with its cousins Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage, broccoli contains sulfur compounds that can filter out carcinogens that promote tumor growth.
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Blogger Spotlight: TV Dinner
August 22nd, 2013
02:45 PM ET
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We're highlighting local and regional bloggers we think you ought to know about. We can’t be everywhere at once, so we look to these passionate eaters, cooks and writers to keep us tapped into every facet of the food world. Consider this a way to get to know a blog’s taste buds, because, well, you should. And if Jamie Shupak's face seems familiar, it's because you may have seen the Emmy-nominated reporter delivering traffic news on NY1.

Who: Jamie Shupak, of TV Dinner
Where: New York City
Twitter: @JamieShupak

My rheumatoid arthritis used to be so bad in my hands - in particular my wrists and fingers - that I could barely cook. My knuckles were so inflamed they looked like giant red Gobstoppers. I'd still try, struggling to lift heavy pots and pans, prying open boxes and packages with my teeth, and most of the time I'd succeed. But it was exhausting, frustrating, and painful.

I grew up in a house where my mom cooked for my dad, two brothers and me almost every night of the week, so ordering in or going out all the time just didn't register with me. I've always loved the whole process of dinner time: from meal planning to grocery shopping, preparing and cooking, and then, naturally, eating. There's something so satisfying about creating a meal for someone you love. 
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Filed under: Blog Spotlight • Blogs • Food as Medicine • Health News • Rituals • Think • Vegan


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