March 25th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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"Got Camel milk?" Camel milk is being touted as world's next superfood, says Erin Burnett.

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Filed under: Food as Medicine • Out Front • Television


Black chicken stew for the ill and adventurous soul
February 19th, 2013
05:15 PM ET
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It was a devil of a cold. A tickle gave way to a rasp, which was swallowed up by a tide of winter ick that proved impervious to pharmaceutical intervention. After two weeks of hacking, wheezing and Googling "cough with a squeak at the end," it was time for an exorcism.

It was time for soup.
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Soups to get you through flu season
January 23rd, 2013
02:45 PM ET
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Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

The flu is still wreaking havoc across the country. Here’s how bad things have gotten in NYC: The Manhattan Soccer Club recently asked its young players not to high-five or fist-bump one another for fear of spreading germs. Players are allowed to touch elbows to signal their team spirit.

If you’ve already high-fived the wrong person and come down with the flu, there are ways to make yourself better. One is to get out your soup spoon and dig into a bowl of supremely satisfying soup. While there’s not hard, fast scientific research that soup can fight the flu - apart from the steam from hot soup possibly helping to clear out clogged noses - no doubt it will definitely make you feel comforted. Especially if your soup comes from one of the following places.
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Green soup to fight the office funk
January 17th, 2013
01:18 PM ET
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Ashley Strickland is an associate producer at CNN.com. She likes cajoling recipes from athletes and studying up on food holidays. We ran this post in 2011, and it seemed painfully relevant this flu season.

After the “office funk” attacked for the third time this fall, I decided to take action. I needed to find an antioxidant powerhouse with the strength to fight off any and all germs and allergies. The usual suspects just weren’t cutting it and I needed a new weapon.

During my frantic search, I stumbled upon something with such a miraculous list of healthy ingredients, I couldn’t say no. And last week, I’m proud to say that green soup entered my life.

Get the recipe and the rest of the story

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Filed under: Food as Medicine • Health News • Soup • Staples


In the dead of winter, orange you glad for clementines?
November 27th, 2012
09:30 AM ET
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Here in the cold, dark, horrible nub end months of the year, I jam clementines into my mouth like it's my job. Two, four, six at a sitting, I'll dig the edge of my least-ragged nail into the rind and claw away the loose skin to reveal the dewy, seedless segments inside. Rinds pile up in pungent heaps on every flat surface around me - exoskeletons shed by sweet-blooded alien insects that have come to Earth to lift me from my seasonal funk.

I'd stop and take them to a trash bin, but that would mean precious seconds not spent stuffing oranges into my face in the manner of a crazed bonobo. I will set upon a cheap, plywood crate or red net sack full of clementines and dispatch quarters, thirds, halves at a time until there is nothing left but a fine mist of citrus oil coating all nearby surfaces like a cheery arterial spray.

I am certain it is horrifying to watch, and it is in the best interest of all my personal and professional relationships that these little fruits are only available for a brief period each winter.
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This is why you are self-medicating with mac 'n' cheese and cookies right now
November 2nd, 2012
11:30 AM ET
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Editor's note: Dr. Melina Jampolis, CNN's diet and fitness expert, is a physician, nutrition specialist and the author of "The Calendar Diet: A Month by Month Guide to Losing Weight While Living Your Life."

Q: Why do we crave comfort foods when the weather turns cold? And are there healthy substitutes?

A: This is an interesting question and one to which there is no simple answer.

There is considerable research showing seasonal affective disorder (SAD) - which affects 1% to 3% of the population - is linked to increased appetite and carbohydrate cravings, which are probably consumed in the form of "comfort foods." This is likely due to changes in brain chemistry brought about by the change in seasons and alterations in circadian rhythm, the body's biological clock.
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Prepping for debate? Optimize your plate
October 3rd, 2012
11:45 AM ET
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Coming up October 16, 2012: Second Presidential Debate @ 7pm ET

Presidential candidates Barack Obama and Mitt Romney may have been gobbling their way through the greasy spoon grub and deep-fried fare of the campaign trail, but today - it's crunch time. The two men need to be firing on all cerebral cylinders for tonight's presidential debate at the University of Denver, and can use every advantage they can get.

Voters will be hanging on every word that comes out of the candidates' mouths, so in these final hours, it's crucial what goes into them. We turned to David Solot, a Ph.D. student in organizational psychology at Walden University, with a Masters in clinical psychology to share his top tips for maximizing mental performance via food.
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Beyond OJ and tomato - hotels offer a serious juice jolt
September 17th, 2012
10:30 AM ET
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Juice - a basic staple of any hotel stay, right? Out on the breakfast buffet, with OJ leading the way and perhaps a choice of grapefruit, apple or tomato for the daring few who may feel like deviating from the mainstream.

Well, think again. Juice - freshly-squeezed from an arcane assortment of veggies as well as fruit, and in more combinations than you can imagine, has become a unique selling point at several hotels this year. These are places that believe juice is not just for breakfast, but at the center of wellness or detox programs they say jaded travelers are crying out for.
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Doctors write a prescription for fresh produce
July 23rd, 2012
10:00 AM ET
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Bad cholesterol, depression, high blood pressure; these are all conditions that often prompt a trip to the pharmacy. But now, physicians are administering a different treatment entirely: produce. Doctors at select clinics across the country are writing some obese patients "prescriptions" for fruits and vegetables.

The Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program provides daily $1 subsidies to buy produce at local farmers markets. FVRx, as it is also known, is funded through Wholesome Wave, a non-profit organization which operates from private donations. Each member of a family gets the $1 prescription so, for example, a family of five would end up getting $35 per week to spend on fresh fruits and vegetables.
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