April 1st, 2014
02:00 PM ET
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You know the saying, "An apple a day keeps the doctor away"? Turns out eating one apple isn't enough. A new study suggests people who eat up to seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day can cut their risk of death by 42% – and that vegetables may be more important than fruit to your overall health.

The study, conducted by scientists in the United Kingdom, was published online Monday in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.
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Filed under: Eating Habits • Food as Medicine • Fruit • Health News • Ingredients • Vegetables


'Clean eating' defined
January 23rd, 2014
03:15 PM ET
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Editor's note: Cynthia Sass is a registered dietitian with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health, and the author of "S.A.S.S! Yourself Slim: Conquer Cravings, Drop Pounds and Lose Inches." Connect with Cynthia on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

The first time I heard the word "clean" in relation to food was way back in the mid-1990s. I attended a conference about supermarket trends, and learned that grocery chains were starting to "clean up" store brand ingredient lists by removing unrecognizable terms.

Back then, this move was considered controversial, because it involved doing away with added nutrients, listed by their technical, non-household names (like pantothenic acid, a B vitamin), as well as eliminating preservatives, which meant short shelf lives (e.g., would consumers really want bread that gets hard or moldy within a few days?).
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Food: it's good for what ails ya
August 30th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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Can't sleep? Got the PMS blues? Before you open your medicine cabinet, step into your kitchen.

"Real, whole, fresh food is the most powerful drug on the planet," says the author of "The Blood Sugar Solution" cookbook, Dr. Mark Hyman. "It regulates every biological function of your body." In fact, recent research suggests not only what to eat but when to eat it for maximum benefit. Check out the latest smart food fixes.

Problem: I'm bloated

Food fix #1: Dig in to juicy fruits and vegetables
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Broccoli may be your arthritis-fighting friend
August 28th, 2013
12:30 PM ET
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Even if you're not a fan of broccoli, your joints may be.

Nutritionists have rhapsodized about the various benefits of broccoli — the cruciferous vegetable is stuffed with vitamins A, B, K, C, as well as nutrients such as potassium, zinc and fiber — and arthritis sufferers may soon join them.

Along with its cousins Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage, broccoli contains sulfur compounds that can filter out carcinogens that promote tumor growth.
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Blogger Spotlight: TV Dinner
August 22nd, 2013
02:45 PM ET
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We're highlighting local and regional bloggers we think you ought to know about. We can’t be everywhere at once, so we look to these passionate eaters, cooks and writers to keep us tapped into every facet of the food world. Consider this a way to get to know a blog’s taste buds, because, well, you should. And if Jamie Shupak's face seems familiar, it's because you may have seen the Emmy-nominated reporter delivering traffic news on NY1.

Who: Jamie Shupak, of TV Dinner
Where: New York City
Twitter: @JamieShupak

My rheumatoid arthritis used to be so bad in my hands - in particular my wrists and fingers - that I could barely cook. My knuckles were so inflamed they looked like giant red Gobstoppers. I'd still try, struggling to lift heavy pots and pans, prying open boxes and packages with my teeth, and most of the time I'd succeed. But it was exhausting, frustrating, and painful.

I grew up in a house where my mom cooked for my dad, two brothers and me almost every night of the week, so ordering in or going out all the time just didn't register with me. I've always loved the whole process of dinner time: from meal planning to grocery shopping, preparing and cooking, and then, naturally, eating. There's something so satisfying about creating a meal for someone you love. 
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Filed under: Blog Spotlight • Blogs • Food as Medicine • Health News • Rituals • Think • Vegan


Eat your way strong, happy, attractive and lean
April 23rd, 2013
10:15 AM ET
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There's a food movement afoot: Eating well to look, feel, and perform our very best is hot.

And as Jamie Oliver and Michelle Obama alike are showing us, this isn't a matter of choking down foods because they're good for you. It's about filling your plate with delicious fare.

"Food, if it's chosen well, can reshape our medical destinies for the better," says Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale Prevention Research Center. It can also improve our mood and focus. Here's how to graze your way to a supercharged you.
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March 25th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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"Got Camel milk?" Camel milk is being touted as world's next superfood, says Erin Burnett.

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Filed under: Food as Medicine • Out Front • Television


Black chicken stew for the ill and adventurous soul
February 19th, 2013
05:15 PM ET
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It was a devil of a cold. A tickle gave way to a rasp, which was swallowed up by a tide of winter ick that proved impervious to pharmaceutical intervention. After two weeks of hacking, wheezing and Googling "cough with a squeak at the end," it was time for an exorcism.

It was time for soup.
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Soups to get you through flu season
January 23rd, 2013
02:45 PM ET
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Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

The flu is still wreaking havoc across the country. Here’s how bad things have gotten in NYC: The Manhattan Soccer Club recently asked its young players not to high-five or fist-bump one another for fear of spreading germs. Players are allowed to touch elbows to signal their team spirit.

If you’ve already high-fived the wrong person and come down with the flu, there are ways to make yourself better. One is to get out your soup spoon and dig into a bowl of supremely satisfying soup. While there’s not hard, fast scientific research that soup can fight the flu - apart from the steam from hot soup possibly helping to clear out clogged noses - no doubt it will definitely make you feel comforted. Especially if your soup comes from one of the following places.
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