Licking my food addiction
January 8th, 2014
07:00 AM ET
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Amy Chillag is a CNN Writer/Producer.

At 5’ 1” my small, 42-year-old frame was taking on a dreadful Body Mass Index. I'd start in on a pint of coffee ice cream at three in the afternoon, every day.  Not just any ice cream, but Bon Appetit top-10-rated best-in-the-nation ice cream that just happens to be a five minute drive from my house.

I didn’t know how to stop. I'd sit on my couch and scoop one creamy spoonful after another. It was never enough. I could not put the spoon down.  I'd feel sick after downing three-quarters of a pint of that coffee temptress.

My psychologist would later explain I'm trying to fill a void. What void? I have a good job, a thoughtful, handsome and loving boyfriend, two Boston Terriers who love me. But these things, as they always do, go back to childhood.

What I didn't realize is I've been depressed for a couple of years, gradually getting worse and relying on sweets to give me a high that buzzed a pleasure center in my brain increasing evidence shows could be as addictive as cocaine.
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Filed under: Diet Tools • Diets • Eating Disorders • Eating Habits • Health News


Holidays may hinder eating disorder recovery
December 20th, 2012
06:00 PM ET
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Editor's note: Dr. Kenneth Weiner is founding partner and chief executive officer of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, Colorado.

According to the iconic holiday tune, "'Tis the season to be jolly."

Unfortunately, popular myths about the magic of the holidays set many Americans up for a struggle with real life. For the millions of men, women and children recovering from an eating disorder, the holiday season can bring heightened stress associated with an overwhelming schedule of events, painful or frustrating family dynamics and a seemingly constant focus on food that begins at Halloween and continues through New Year's Day.
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The secret of the 'heaving bowl' – how jockeys make weight
October 23rd, 2012
11:30 AM ET
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From the moment the ancient Greeks held the first Olympics 2,700 years ago, our picture perfect image of elite sportsmen has revolved around the oiled, ripped, macho body.

But not all our leading sports stars fit the stereotypical bill of chest-thumping demigods.

Some, such as jockeys, instead go to extreme lengths to stunt their growth - sometimes down to the size of a pre-pubescent child.

In an industry where just a few extra pounds can rule you out of a multi-million dollar race, jockeys are put under enormous pressure to meet miniature weight requirements.
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Filed under: Diets • Eating Disorders • Health News • Sports


Are you eating in your sleep?
March 9th, 2011
10:00 AM ET
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From our pals at CNN Health's The Chart:

She was alarmed by the time that she made a baked potato in the middle of the night. “Do you know how long it takes to bake a potato! It scares me that the episodes last that long and also the reason I know that I baked it in the oven, rather than microwaving it, is because the oven was still on in the morning.”

Then the things that she was eating got a bit bizarre. For example, one time, her husband found her trying to eat a frozen veggie burger. But what brought her to the sleep center was the episode where she found an open, half-eaten can of cat food and she was not sure if she had really fed it to her cat.

Read Get Some Sleep: Do you eat in your sleep?



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