Subway removes controversial chemical from bread
February 7th, 2014
09:59 AM ET
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Take a look at ingredients for some varieties of Subway's bread and you'll find a chemical that may seem unfamiliar and hard to pronounce: azodicarbonamide.

To say this word, you would emphasize the syllable "bon" - but the attention the chemical has been getting has not been good. Besides bread, the chemical is also found in yoga mats and shoe soles to add elasticity.
But it's not long for bread at Subway: The company says it's coming out.

"We are already in the process of removing azodicarbonamide as part of our bread improvement efforts despite the fact that it is (a) USDA and FDA approved ingredient," Subway said in a statement. "The complete conversion to have this product out of the bread will be done soon."
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Filed under: Food Safety • Food Science • Health News • Subway


Does microwaving nuke nutrition?
January 22nd, 2014
10:00 AM ET
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Editor's note: upwave is Turner Broadcasting's new lifestyle brand designed to entertain the health into you! Visit upwave.com for more information and follow upwave on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram @upwave.

The rumor: Zapping food in a microwave leaches out key nutrients

We've all heard about how microwaving food removes some nutritional value, but is it true? Is something bad happening to our food behind that microwave glass?
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Filed under: Food Science • Health News


Hershey's 3-D printer: dream it, print it, eat it
January 16th, 2014
11:45 PM ET
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Because apparently Americans don't have easy enough access to junk food, soon getting a candy bar could be as easy as hitting "print."

3D Systems announced a deal with Hershey's Thursday to collaborate on developing a 3-D printer that makes chocolate and other edible products.
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Filed under: Food Science • Technology


November 28th, 2013
09:00 AM ET
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Before you tuck in to your gravy-drenched, slow-roasted turkey this Thanksgiving, you might want to give thanks that you’re not circling above the earth at 17,500 miles per hour. Forget for a moment that you probably couldn’t even keep the food down in microgravity – would you be willing to trade those creamy mashed potatoes or Grandma’s green been casserole for something freeze-dried and wrapped in plastic?

For six astronauts currently working more than 200 miles above the surface of the earth, that choice is easy, as freeze-dried, irradiated and thermostablized food items are their only options. Luckily for them, food scientist Vickie Kloeris and her team at NASA have developed shelf-stable Thanksgiving meals to celebrate the holiday on the International Space Station. First though, they had to figure out a way to make the food taste good in space.

“One of our biggest challenges is that crew members in orbit do report that they feel like their taste buds are somewhat dulled,” Kloeris told CNN from the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.
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Filed under: Food Science • Holidays • Thanksgiving • Thanksgiving


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