October 1st, 2012
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Bees, bees, everywhere! 50,000 of them - on purpose.

Table 45 in the Cleveland InterContinental Hotel is nourishing a beehive on top of their building in an effort to eat more locally-grown food.
FULL POST



Notes from Zone 6b - love and loss in the lettuce patch
June 19th, 2012
01:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

Very early one summer morning, my husband crept into my home office, and was alarmed to find two rabbits staring at him. It wasn't the lagomorphic presence that rattled him - just that there should have been a third pair of eyes blinking back.

He ducked down and peered deeply into the cluster of old potato chip boxes that Claudette had fashioned into into a makeshift warren. No bunny. It was then he noticed that the dog fence cordoning off her living quarters had been nudged apart just wide enough to let her tiny body slip through. She'd made a break for it, and there was only one place she could have gone.
FULL POST



iReport: Grow it and show it
April 19th, 2012
02:00 PM ET
Share this on:

There are lots of reasons to grow your own food. It’s cheaper, safer, healthier, better for the environment, and even reduces stress.

So this year, we challenge you to grow one thing for your dinner table: Herb, vegetable, fruit … just one thing that you cultivate yourself.

Whether you're using a rooftop, countertop, or community garden, if you're blessed with full sun or none, we invite you to join the iReport kitchen garden club - and chronicle your successes and foibles through photos and video.

We'll all learn together.

Let's get started! See the garden assignment on iReport.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Buzz • Gardening • Gardening • iReport • Local Food • Rooftop Gardening • Urban Gardening


March 28th, 2012
04:45 PM ET
Share this on:

Too broke? Too busy? Too...nope. We're having none of that. This is the year you garden.

Watch Eatocracy on CNN Newsroom every Wednesday at 12:45 ET.



This is the year you garden
March 22nd, 2012
01:30 PM ET
Share this on:

Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

This year, you'll grow your own food. Not all of it and probably not even most or much of it. But you'll grow some, and that's going to change your life.

There are plenty of reasons to do this. Andrew Zimmern told us just this week that. "If everyone grew what they could, supported urban farms and community gardens in cities and local CSAs, the pressure relief on our overtaxed system would be immense. The resulting dollar shift would be staggering and deliver a positive shot in the arm to local economies. Our food would also be safer. Small action here can yield tremendous impact, immediately."

That's awfully compelling - and pretty intense. Perhaps start small. Grow an herb you are sick of having to pay money for at a store. Grow a vegetable that reminds you of how a grandparent's kitchen smelled. Grow a fruit you always want to have at your fingertips. Grow an ingredient that will make your sauce, stew, soup or salad taste the way it did when you had it at that little cafe in Rome, France, Mexico City or Des Moines.
FULL POST



5@5 - Celebrate your herb bounty
September 21st, 2011
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Excess herbs - there are worse problems to have. But when you've gone to the trouble of growing them in boxes on a rooftop in the middle of a busy city, you want to make sure you use them to their fullest potential.

Scott Walton, executive chef at Markethouse Restaurant in Chicago specializes in fresh, locally sourced ingredients - some grown mere feet above diners' heads - and it's his mission to make sure every bit of it is sufficiently savored.

C'mon - thyme's a wasting!

Five Ways to Use Herbs Year 'Round: Scott Walton
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Herbs • Ingredients • Rooftop Gardening • Think • Urban Gardening


Notes from Zone 6b - a kernel of wisdom
August 2nd, 2011
10:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

This morning, I stood on my roof deck and made my African Guinea Flint corn have sex with itself.

Some folks knit, ride dirt bikes or collect small, disturbingly lifelike figurines of a baby Lord Voldemort. I get my kicks from raising heirloom vegetables.

The process isn't always quite so hands-on. Mostly, it's just a matter of sticking seeds or shoots in dirt, fertilizing, watering and presto - potatoes, tomatoes and radishes as far as the eye can see. And if you have the acreage, corn would probably not require the services of a social director.
FULL POST



Notes from Zone 6b – letting failure bloom
July 19th, 2011
01:45 PM ET
Share this on:

Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

My edible loofah won't fruit, and there doesn't seem to be a darned thing I can do about it. For that matter, I can't stave off daikon bolt, keep my African Guinea Flint corn from slumping or save my white bush scallop squash from the indignity of slug consumption.

This is mostly my fault, and I have to live with it. I could have just laid down to drown in a deluge of Netflix-streamed episodes of Battlestar Galactica, taken up yogalates or just napped like a normal person, but no, not me. As a friend recently pointed out to me, I use any scrap of down time I have to assign myself an extra job.
FULL POST



Notes from Zone 6b - Tubers on the roof
June 22nd, 2011
10:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

This may seem like small potatoes to you, but I managed to grow some spuds on my own at home. On a roof deck. In Brooklyn.

I know I shouldn't be admitting this in public, but I'd honestly had no idea how potatoes...happen. Sure, I'd seen seed potatoes at the garden center and had a vague memory of an elementary school project involving sprouting eyes. I pieced together that they need the soil scrubbed from their skin, and that there's some sort of blight-prone leaf, but the mechanics of tater gestation had somehow escaped me.
FULL POST



Pinterest
Archive
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
| Part of