July 14th, 2014
07:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

In July, we get to celebrate many things. It’s our nation’s birthday. It’s also National Ice Cream Month. On July 21, you can revel in National Junk Food Day, which I have several ideas for.

And now, I’m excited to celebrate Plastic Free July. The three-year-old project aims to eliminate single-use plastic for the entire month. I love this idea—beaches get so littered with plastic bags, straws, bottles and more, so it’s the perfect time to use reusable totes, those adorable paper straws and biodegradable plates and cutlery.

As usual, several chefs and restaurants are way ahead of me, including my hero Mario Batali. Let’s salute some of the especially environmentally friendly spots as we celebrate Plastic Free July with biodegradable cups and no plastic straws!
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Content Partner • Environment • Food and Wine • Ocean • T1 • Waste


July 11th, 2014
11:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Who ordered the anchovies?

That's what beach-goers may be asking after a huge swarm of the oily fish descended on the shallow waters of La Jolla Shores, California, this week.

"It is rare to see so many anchovy abutting the surf zone," said Professor Dave Checkley of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). "More usually, schools are seen hundreds of yards to many miles offshore." The surf zone is the area in which waves break on shore and humans normally swim.
FULL POST



January 10th, 2014
08:45 AM ET
Share this on:

Zak Smith is an attorney with the marine mammal protection project at the Natural Resources Defense Council in Santa Monica, California.

Did you know that buying American seafood could save a whale?

A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council finds that 91% of seafood consumed in the United States is imported and nearly every wild-caught foreign fish product sold in the U.S. violates the Marine Mammal Protection Act, endangering the lives of marine mammals around the world.

Countries exporting fish to America are supposed to prove they use safe methods to catch fish destined for the U.S. market. But for decades the U.S. has failed to enforce this law. That means whales, dolphins and sea lions are at risk, and American fishermen who invest in safer methods have a disadvantage in the marketplace.
FULL POST



September 12th, 2013
09:45 AM ET
Share this on:

A massive molasses spill this week in Honolulu Harbor could lead to an increase in the number of sharks, barracuda and eels as well as bacteria in the area, the Hawaii Department of Health warned.

"While molasses is not harmful to the public directly, the substance is polluting the water, causing fish to die and could lead to an increase in predator species," the health department said in a prepared statement Wednesday.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Disaster • Environment • Ocean


Pinterest
| Part of
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,413 other followers