March 14th, 2014
11:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Christopher Dawson is a producer with CNN Special Projects and works with CNN's Impact Your World team. Video by Greg Bowman, Eatocracy's go-to beer guy.

If that last beer made you feel a little warm and fuzzy inside, it could be because you just did some good. You may have just donated to a charity, just by buying a drink.

I first noticed this philanthropy trend while enjoying a new limited release IPA from Sweetwater Brewery called Second Helping. The name implies having more, and the compelling flavoring of juniper berries and chocolate malts had already sold me on that proposition.

But then I read the beer’s label and learned that it was crafted to benefit a charity called The Giving Kitchen, which helps people in the food industry going through hard times. This initiative was inspired by Atlanta chef Ryan Hidinger, who brought the Atlanta restaurant community together when he fought and ultimately lost his battle with cancer. His wife and friends decided to take the generous funds that were raised to help Ryan and pay it forward by creating this charity. I admit that it got me when I read that the juniper berries were added for Ryan, because he so enjoyed cooking with them.
FULL POST

Posted by: ,
Filed under: Bars • Beer • Charity • Sip • St. Patrick's Day


March 12th, 2014
08:30 AM ET
Share this on:

When you think about the images typically associated with hunger, a recreation of the Mad Hatter's tea party from "Alice in Wonderland" might not spring to mind.

But one Florida nonprofit is using recreated scenes from popular movies, musicals and TV shows to get people talking about poverty and hunger.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • Food Politics • Hunger • iReport • Photography


March 10th, 2014
07:05 AM ET
Share this on:

Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

You’ve read about them before: the $750 cupcake and $5,000 burger you can find in Las Vegas; the $10,000 martini on sale in West Hollywood. Some people must be ordering them and feeling like it was money well spent. Lots of others will file those dishes under the Ripped-off-at-a-Restaurant category.

On the other end of the spectrum is a new model that’s gaining traction across the country and around the world: pay-what-you-want spots. You make the call on the price of the dish, and when you pay a little extra it helps feed people who are in need. Right on for the places below.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Chain • Charity • Content Partner • Food and Wine • Hunger • Restaurants


February 5th, 2014
02:45 PM ET
Share this on:

Last week, dozens of children at a Utah elementary school had their lunch trays snatched away from them before they could take a bite. Workers at Uintah Elementary School removed the already-served food because some students had negative balances in the accounts used to pay for lunches.

Kenny Thompson didn't want to see that repeated at Houston's Valley Oaks Elementary School. KPRC reports that on Monday, the longtime mentor and tutor paid off the negative lunch account balances of more than 60 students.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • Human Rights • Hunger • Local Heroes • School Lunch


NYC mayor's pizza technique is a big forking deal for charity
January 16th, 2014
11:15 AM ET
Share this on:

Mayor Bill de Blasio bit into some unexpected publicity recently when he was photographed politely eating pizza - with a knife and fork.

At a Staten Island pizzeria, no less.

Now, the act that sent the Internet into a frenzy with chatter about what most New Yorkers scorn as a serious food flub portends to deliver some dough - as in money - to charity.

Goodfella's Pizzeria co-owner Marc Cosentino says he will auction off the infamous fork that de Blasio used in a charity fundraiser.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • New York • Pizza


9-year-old girls save the world
December 13th, 2013
01:15 PM ET
Share this on:

Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

A few weeks ago, we spotlighted restaurants that said no kids allowed.

It turns out that several kids out there have things to do besides worry about getting shut out of steak houses in Pittsburgh or Mexican fish spots in Houston. They’re busy figuring out how to feed hungry children around the world, fight child slavery and get rid of Styrofoam.

So let’s have a big round of applause for these extraordinary kids, and support everything they’re doing.
FULL POST



How to feed your family from a food bank
November 13th, 2013
12:15 PM ET
Share this on:

Marisa Miller is a married mother of two who never imagined she'd find herself relying on the kindness of others to feed her family. As a former chef, her life was filled with abundant food, and her husband had a lucrative job. Between the two of them, an organic, grass-fed, sustainable and delicious life seemed assured.

But things changed. Her husband left that job to pursue a career in a field about which he was passionate, and in the height of the recession, his salary was cut by 60%. The family became food insecure in a matter of months.

Their household income is just above the qualifying levels to receive SNAP, WIC or any other kind of assistance. After bills, Miller has just $100 left over for food, gas, clothing, band-aids, toilet paper and other necessities. She supplements her grocery-buying with trips to her local Sacramento, California, food pantry and an awful lot of thoughtful, creative cooking and meal planning.

"No one is living off Top Ramen in this house," Miller told Eatocracy in an e-mail exchange.

Here's what she had to say about dignity, practicality and perception when you're struggling to feed your family.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • Human Rights • Hunger • SNAP


August 14th, 2013
02:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Depression is a daily struggle for millions of people, and stigma around the illness only adds to the burden. Emma Thomas' Depressed Cake Shop campaign is helping make conversations around the taboo topic a piece of cake.

"The concept is: make gray cakes, sell gray cakes and create a platform for discussion and media coverage," said Thomas. "And I think that's what we've done."

The London-based PR specialist and creative director became increasingly aware that people in the creative community around her frequently suffer from depression, but don't always have the freedom to discuss this with people in their professional or personal lives.

"If you go to the doctor and you're depressed the doctor will sign you off with stress so depression isn't on your record," Thomas said. "If you return to work after having the flu, people don't judge you forever. But if you have depression and you return to work after being down, you're judged forever."
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Cake • Charity • Dessert • Events • Favorites • Health News


May 31st, 2013
04:30 PM ET
Share this on:

Atlanta chef Ryan Hidinger passed away in January after a year-long battle with cancer that inspired a non-profit dedicated to supporting members of Atlanta’s hospitality industry. Over the years, Eatocracy had the good fortune of spending time Ryan and Jen Hidinger through their culinary endeavors; first, in their Grant Park home for their Staplehouse supper club; and in 2013, when the Hidingers launched the Giving Kitchen, a non-profit that supports members of the culinary community who encounter unexpected financial hardship.

The Giving Kitchen will be funded in part by a brick-and-mortar restaurant slated to open in 2014.

Ryan and Jen Hidinger have welcomed hundreds of strangers into their Atlanta home, 10 people at a time, for the supper club inaugurated as Staplehouse in 2009.

With each five-course meal, the husband-wife team built a devoted and diverse fanbase while Ryan Hidinger, a chef by trade, honed his skills in the kitchen and Jen Hidinger got a crash course in restaurant management.

Four years and nearly 200 meals later, the Hidingers are one step closer to their dream of opening a restaurant. They finally have a space in Atlanta’s Old 4th Ward, just a few blocks from the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. They also have a unique model that guarantees they’ll never get rich off the venture. Instead, 100% of profits from Staplehouse restaurant will go to a non-profit the couple started that supports members of the culinary community who encounter unexpected financial hardship.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • Favorites • News • Restaurants • Underground


Pinterest
Archive
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
| Part of