April 9th, 2014
04:00 PM ET
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World-renowned chef, author and Emmy-winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits Punjab, India, in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, April 13, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

Chances are if you've ordered from an Indian restaurant in the United States, the intensely colored and spiced dishes have been Punjabi in origin.

"Most of the good stuff we refer to simply as Indian food comes from here," host Anthony Bourdain says in the season three premiere of "Parts Unknown," where he travels to the northern region of the world's second most populated country.

In Amritsar, India's holy city of the Sikh religion, carnivorously-inclined Bourdain finds himself among a bounty of vegetables cooked in rich, spicy gravies served with freshly baked kulcha, a type of flatbread, out of clay ovens.
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April 3rd, 2014
05:00 PM ET
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UK celebrity chef Nigella Lawson, whose private life hit the headlines when she testified about drug use last year, was prevented from boarding a flight from London to the United States, a U.S. official said Thursday.

Lawson was turned back from boarding British Airways Flight 283 from London Heathrow to Los Angeles on March 30, said Lynne Platt, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Embassy in London.

Platt would not say why Lawson had been stopped. A representative for Lawson declined to comment.
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Filed under: Celebrities • Celebrity Chefs • Nigella Lawson


March 17th, 2014
09:00 AM ET
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Jeremy Harlan is a CNN photojournalist. He has previously covered, veterans in the kitchen, veal farming and life on the campaign trail.

Is there no greater signal of spring than a grocery store’s meat section overflowing with corned beef briskets? I really can’t think of one.

I’m not Irish, and I don't pretend to be the biggest beer drinker or have a vast collection of emerald threads in my closet. So boiling a large pot of corned beef and cabbage has been my go-to tradition in honoring Ireland’s patron saint.

My wife, on the other hand, does not share my appreciation for this annual March feast. I believe her exact words (a nod to Anchorman) are, “Ugh, that smells like Sex Panther.”

Sixty percent of the time, she hates it every time.

So this year I’ve scrapped the corned beef and cabbage menu in hopes of finding a meal more authentic to Ireland. Come to find out, it was never really an Irish tradition in the first place.
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Filed under: Cathal Armstrong • Cooking • Make • Recipes • St. Patrick's Day


February 27th, 2014
03:45 PM ET
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Paula Deen might be on track to issue another apology.

After her career in food imploded last year when she admitted to previously using a racial slur, the 67-year-old celebrity chef is trying to slowly rebuild what she's lost.

However, her recent cover story with People magazine is having the opposite effect.

In the article, Deen says she is finding inspiration in what might seem an unusual place given her past troubles.
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Paula Deen


February 26th, 2014
11:15 AM ET
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Paula Deen is back, y'all. She's opening a restaurant this summer at the foot of the Smoky Mountains, marking her first move back into business after a scandal derailed her many enterprises.

Deen's new restaurant and retail store will be called "Paula Deen's Family Kitchen" and located in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

The 20,000 square foot Southern-fried facility is the premiere enterprise to come out of her new firm, Paula Deen Ventures, which was launched just weeks ago with backing from Phoenix-based Najafi Media. It will have an operating budget of about $20 million.
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Paula Deen


February 24th, 2014
10:30 AM ET
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Celebrity chef Paula Deen drew a standing ovation from a crowd of several hundred people Sunday in Miami Beach as she made her fourth public appearance since a controversy over her admitted use of a racial epithet in the past.

"We have come off a hard summer ... my family and my partners ... and I want to take a moment to apologize to those of you who didn't hear me. I hope you see us bring back good memories for you," an emotional Deen told the crowd at the prestigious South Beach Wine and Food Festival.

Looking thinner than she has in the past and appearing overjoyed by the exuberant reception, Deen said she used her months out of the spotlight to spend a lot of quality time with her grandchildren. While Deen was preparing one of her famous dumpling dishes, she invited celebrity chef Robert Irvine to the stage, and Irvine then jokingly said to her "you apologized. You've eaten crow. Just don't do it anymore."
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Events • Paula Deen • SOBE


February 12th, 2014
04:00 PM ET
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Paula Deen is coming back.

Less than a year after her association with a racist slur led to the loss of her TV contract and many sponsors, Deen has created a new company. Paula Deen Ventures includes all the restaurants, cruises, cookbooks, cookware and other products that focus on her touting of traditional Southern cuisine.

Deen is partnering with Phoenix-based Najafi Media, which specializes in consumer distribution. Jahm Najafi, founder and chief executive officer, said in a statement Wednesday that he has "a deep respect for the hard work, unique content and quality products which Paula has built around her brand."
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Paula Deen


Edna Lewis and Judith Jones at the American table
February 10th, 2014
05:15 PM ET
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Editor's note: The Southern Foodways Alliance delves deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of Southern food. Here’s a tidbit from the latest issue of Gravy quarterly. The author of this piece, Sara B. Franklin, is a doctoral student, food writer and educator. She is currently working on an oral history project with editor Judith Jones, exploring food and memory.

Today, “local” is such a culinary buzzword that it’s almost passé. Good chefs interpret the places from which they hail, and nowhere has this revival of place been stronger than in the American South. In a cultural moment like this, we forget it wasn’t long ago that much of America was ignorant, if not downright ashamed, of its regional cuisines. Judith Jones, a longtime editor at Knopf in New York City, who retired last year at age eighty-eight, helped introduce American palates to international cuisines and elevate domestic regional foodways. Her interest in regional cookery was piqued by Edna Lewis, the Virginia-born chef and writer.

Jones was still a wet-behind-the-ears junior editor at Knopf when she shepherded Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking through publication in 1961. At the time, postwar prosperity brought boxed cake mixes and frozen vegetables to supermarkets, promising quick and easy paths to domestic bliss. Child and Jones weren’t fooled. Really good food, they knew, demanded an attentive and skillful cook, one who wasn’t afraid of having a bit of fun.
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February 5th, 2014
06:00 PM ET
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Hunger had at one point been nearly eliminated in the United States. So how did it become such a massive and pressing issue once again?

Chef and activist Tom Colicchio cites, among other things, a changing political landscape that resulted in a working population left unable to feed themselves and their families.

"When you have a sixth of the population that can't really participate in the American dream, you start questioning whether the American dream is pretty much over," he told CNN's chief international correspondent Christiane Amanpour.
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Human Rights • Hunger • Tom Colicchio


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