November 1st, 2013
12:45 PM ET
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Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

News broke this week, thanks to a report by a pair of Melbourne, Australia-based Morgan Stanley analysts, that we are on the verge of a global wine shortage of unprecedented proportions. Egad!

Being a wine critic, of course, this prediction chilled me to my very bones. Apparently, despite the fact that the world’s vineyards produce some 2.8 billion cases of wine each year, we want more than that. We’re a wine-crazed bunch, we humans.
 
But before the riots in the street start, I should also point out that several other financial institutions weighed in just the other day, more or less saying that Morgan Stanley’s report was so much hogwash (if you wash your hogs with wine, that is; not many people do, but it does make them an attractive purple color). These other financial experts note that wine production in 2013 is up, that we used to be swimming in a lake of surplus wine and now we are not (a good thing), and that all this vinous doom and gloom is mighty darn premature.
 
Not being an economist, I’m not going to tell you who’s right. But just in case a wine-shortage disaster is nigh, here are five great affordable wines to buy by the truckload, right now.
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Kraft kicks yellow dye to the curb
November 1st, 2013
11:45 AM ET
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When SpongeBob SquarePants skips onto shelves in boxes of Kraft Macaroni and Cheese next year, he may be a little less, well, yellow than your kids are used to.

Kraft has revamped its character-shaped product line for 2014, according to company spokeswoman Lynne Galia. The new versions will have six additional grams of whole grains, be lower in sodium and saturated fat, and will use spices instead of artificial food dyes to create its famous yellow-orange color.
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October 30th, 2013
06:30 PM ET
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What would Olivia Pope do?

The impeccably dressed crisis consultant at the center of ABC's runaway hit Scandal rarely goes an episode without a fishbowl-sized glass of red wine in her hand. But how would she spin it if her beloved vino were suddenly in short supply?

Analysts for Morgan Stanley reported yesterday that the wine industry is experiencing an "undersupply of nearly 300 million cases" a year, leaving some oenophiles worried about where their next case is coming from.

Belinda Chang, a former James Beard Award Outstanding Wine Service Award winner and current Champagne Educator for Moet Hennessy, told CNN, "Tell my friends and family I love them, but they will have to BYO to my parties moving forward."

Naturally, social media gulped down the news and commenced panicking and plotting - hilariously.
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Filed under: Big Business • Business and Farming News • Sip • Wine


October 30th, 2013
12:30 PM ET
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Update, April 10: The Los Angeles Times reports that the Irwindale City Council voted unanimously to declare the odor from Sriracha hot sauce production to be a public nuisance. The company has been given 90 days to correct the issue.

One man's hot sauce is another man's hell.

The city of Irwindale, California has filed a lawsuit asking for Huy Fong Foods to cease production of its iconic Sriracha sauce after residents complained that smells emanating from the factory have caused them physical harm and driven them from their homes.
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Filed under: Big Business • Business and Farming News • Hot • News


October 29th, 2013
01:00 PM ET
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Editor's note: Jack Temple is a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project, a nonprofit organization that works to promote policies and programs that create jobs and help unemployed workers regain their economic footing.

Don't let McDonald's new "Dollar Menu and More" distract you. Although an order of McNuggets might cost more than a buck now, the truth is that the Dollar Menu was never a bargain.

In reality, whether you eat the fries or not, fast-food companies such as McDonald's actually shift billions of dollars in hidden costs onto taxpayers every year. How? These costs flow directly from their business model of low wages, nonexistent benefits and limited work hours, which force millions of fast-food workers to rely on public assistance to afford basic necessities such as food and health care.
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Filed under: Big Business • Fast Food • Human Rights • McDonald's


October 23rd, 2013
11:30 PM ET
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McDonald's workers should have no problem qualifying for government programs like food stamps and heating assistance.

The hamburger chain pretty much admits that in a call made by a worker to "McResources"– a helpline set up for its workers.

The advocacy group Low Pay is not Ok recorded a phone call made to the helpline by one McDonald's worker Nancy Salgado. The group circulated an edited video of the recording. CNNMoney reviewed the full recording of the call.
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Chocolate costs may crescendo
October 15th, 2013
12:05 AM ET
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Chocolate lovers beware! The price of your favorite treat is on the rise.

Growing demand in emerging markets and bad weather in major cocoa producing countries is pushing up the cost of key ingredients, leaving manufacturers little choice but to pass on some of that pain to consumers.

The price of cocoa butter, for example, stands at a four-year high, having risen by 70% over the past 12 months, according to Mintec commodity consultant Liliana Gonzalez.
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Wonder Bread is back
September 23rd, 2013
06:30 PM ET
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The iconic bread brand returned to store shelves Monday, according to reports, months after a bankruptcy judge approved the sale of Wonder, Twinkies and other assets from the now-defunct Hostess Brands.

Wonder Bread was snatched up along with most of Hostess' other bread brands by Flowers Foods for $360 million. Flowers also produces Tastykake snacks and Nature's Own bread.
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Yes, there exists such a thing as too much wine
July 16th, 2013
11:15 AM ET
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Look out American oenophiles. Roughly one million bottles of wine are about to be poured down the drain.

The Australian winemaker that crafts the popular Penfolds brand is dumping as much as $35 million AUS ($32 million) in wine in the United States.

Treasury Wine Estates says it's working to get rid of "excess, aged and deteriorating inventory" in the U.S. since it was unable to sell the wine as quickly as planned.
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