5 ways to prep for a VERY early morning
March 17th, 2014
06:00 AM ET
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This is the nineteenth installment of "Eat This List" - a regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about.

Brooke Baldwin left Atlanta behind last week for a trip to the Big Apple to fill in as a co-host on New Day. Saying goodbye to her 2 p.m. slot hosting CNN Newsroom also meant saying hello to a brand new (much earlier) work schedule.

“I mean my hotel laughs at me when I call for a wake up at 2:45,” Baldwin said. “I kind of feel like I’m allowed extra guilty stuff in my life.”

Baldwin, who’s been with CNN since 2008 in a variety of roles, generally tries to eat healthy - preferring egg white omelets with vegetables for breakfast and salads with protein for lunch.

However, she says when her routine changes so vastly sometimes she’s got to indulge in the “extra guilty stuff.” 

Working for a morning show takes serious preparation. 
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5 bad excuses for not cooking
February 25th, 2014
07:00 PM ET
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This is the eighteenth installment of "Eat This List" - a regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about.

You should cook. Yes, you. Even if you don't want to.

This isn't like saying that you should learn Ovid in the original Latin for the enrichment of your soul, or requiring that you hunker and hone your julienne and demi-glace skills until you emerge victorious in a battle overseen by Alton Brown or Anthony Bourdain. This is about getting yourself fed and taking a modicum of responsibility for it.

You eat, right? Maybe even more than once a day? (Or even if you ingest some combination of nutrients solely through methods that don't require chewing, smoothies have to taste like something, don't they?) And I'm going to go ahead and assume that you'd like to continue living in your body for the next while. Assembling foodstuffs for intake without the intermediary of a drive-thru speaker, menu, or segmented tray and microwave is the ideal way to facilitate that.

Yet people object, throw their hands in the air and simply refuse. Here's why they're wrong.
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Filed under: Cook • Cooking • Eat This List • Make


January 22nd, 2014
03:45 PM ET
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This is the seventeenth installment of "Eat This List" - a regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about. Pictured above: supermarket shelves plundered in anticipation of a blizzard in January, 2011.

Weather outside? Frightful. Inside? As delightful as you care to craft it.

Just in case you've been huddled up in an igloo or a Tauntaun with no mobile or cable reception, massive snowfall has thwacked a big chunk of the country. Millions of people are either digging out or frozen in place, and it's it's gonna stay chilly over the next few days.

Might as well hunker down and fuel up. Here's what's on my cold weather menu. Or it would be if I were at my home, rather than snowed in an airport motel far from home.
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Filed under: Baked Goods • Bread • Cocktail Recipes • Dishes • Eat This List • Make • Recipes • Soup • Spirits


Eat This List: 2014 food trend predictions
December 19th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
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This is the sixteenth installment of "Eat This List" - a semi-regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about.

As Eatocracy's editors, we're (that's Kat Kinsman and Sarah LeTrent) lucky enough to get to travel and eat all over the country, both for work and because it's what we love to do. We've seen some trends popping up in restaurants from coast to coast, and in 2014, here are a few we think stand a chance of catching on in more home and restaurant kitchens across the country.
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October 28th, 2013
06:00 PM ET
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This is the fifteenth installment of "Eat This List" - a semi-regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about.

Getting tapped as a judge for a barbecue competition sounds like a carnivore's dream come true, especially when it's at the level of The Jack. For 25 years, cooking teams from around the world have converged upon Lynchburg, Tennessee to battle for smoke-soaked supremacy at the Jack Daniel's World Championship Invitational Barbecue.

This past Saturday, 25,000 barbecue devotees showed up to cheer on the 76 United States and 23 international teams that had qualified to participate by winning at the state level or various prestigious competitions. Chicken, ribs, pork and brisket were mandatory categories, and sauce, cook's choice and dessert were optional.

I got to taste them all.

I've been Kansas City Barbeque Society certified since 2008 and judged other food events, so this wasn't my first rodeo, but nothing compares to a competition where a $10,000 prize and such high-test bragging rights are on the line. Richmond, Virginia's Cool Smoke team took home the Grand Champion title, as well as Rockwell, Iowa's Pig Skin BBQ for a separately-judged Winner's Circle of previous Jack champs.

Judges like me left with full stomachs, sauce-stained clothes and some insight into what it takes to judge - and win - at competitive barbecue.
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