Grandma-trained chef spices up Houston
August 12th, 2011
08:00 AM ET
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This summer, CNN's Defining America project is traveling the country with the CNN Express bus and iReport to explore the stories behind the data and demographics that show how places are changing.

To hear Lakesha Reed describe her cooking talents she's not classically trained as a chef, "I'm just grandma trained."

Reed, a New Orleans native, moved to Houston, Texas, in 2005 as one of the city’s thousands of evacuees from Hurricane Katrina. We met her last month when CNN’s Defining America project hit the trail for Texas to find out how the Lone Star State has changed over the past decade.
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Filed under: Cuisines • Defining America • Feature • New Orleans • New Orleans • Texas • Travel


July 15th, 2011
09:15 AM ET
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This summer, CNN's Defining America project is traveling the country with the CNN Express bus and iReport to explore the stories behind the data and demographics that show how places are changing. This week, CNN brings you coverage from Texas.

Barbecue.

In Texas, that's a word worth fighting for.

Just ask the owner of City Meat Market in Lee County, Texas, where folks have been wolfing down beef, chicken and pork served on traditional pink butcher paper for nearly 70 years. Texas Monthly Magazine ranked it among the Top 50 BBQ joints in the state.
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Filed under: Barbecue • Bite • Defining America • Feature • Think • Video


Liver mush – a North Carolina treat from way back when
June 8th, 2011
07:00 AM ET
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This summer, CNN's Defining America project will be traveling the country with the CNN Express bus to explore the stories behind the data and demographics that show how places are changing. This week, CNN brings you coverage from North Carolina.

There was a time when every North Carolina family loved – or at least knew – liver mush. It's the cuisine of grandma's house, snow days and simpler times, a local delicacy some natives defend with the same loyalty they have to Carolina barbecue and Cheerwine.

Back then, it was the economical way to get some meat in your diet when times were tough, a high-iron addition to a kid's lunch, or a fried-till-crispy comfort breakfast beside fat slices of tomato and muskmelon.
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Filed under: Cultural Identity • Culture • Defining America • Food History • North Carolina • Obsessions • Southern • Travel


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