S'no secret why NOLA snoballs are so good
May 21st, 2014
04:15 PM ET
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New Orleans is famous for its delicacies: Po-boys, jambalaya, gumbo, beignets. But here's one you might not have heard of: Snoballs. From March to September, hundreds of shops in the city have lines of customers waiting to get their hands on this New Orleans tradition.

The snoball (also spelled snowball or sno-ball depending on the stand) is a cup of finely shaved ice topped with fruit syrup. If you think this sounds exactly like a snow cone, don't you dare say that in New Orleans.
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Filed under: New Orleans • New Orleans


April 26th, 2014
02:30 PM ET
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If the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival had a Mayor, Vance Vaucresson could be a serious contender.

Even when he's behind his family's sausage po-boy tent, tucked under a New Orleans Saints ball cap and wearing sunglasses, five minutes don't go by without someone stopping by to say hello to him.

"It's like a reunion around here," Vaucresson said between visits. "We're a family, all the vendors."

He shakes a lot of hands, and says a lot of hellos.

"He's just a super friendly, personable guy," festival food director Michelle Nugent said.

Besides Vaucresson's friendly disposition and sparkling blue eyes that make him political gold, he also has history on his side. His family has been a staple at the festival for 45 years.
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Filed under: Events • Jazz Fest • New Orleans • New Orleans • Regional Sandwiches • Sandwiches


March 3rd, 2014
09:00 AM ET
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Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

If you’ll be in New Orleans for Mardi Gras, lucky you.
 
Note that there are new rules for the parade route, the most important one surely being this: Private portable toilets are no longer allowed on public property. You’ll have to leave your personal Porta-Potty at home.
 
If you’re not going to make it to NOLA, there are plenty of other places where you can pretend like you’re there, and here are a few.
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Urban farming roots community after BP spill
October 14th, 2013
10:15 PM ET
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Editor's note: Next year, the Southern Foodways Alliance will explore inclusion and exclusion at the Southern table in 2014. This theme is two-fold. It marks the 50th anniversary of the desegregation of Southern restaurants. It also challenges us to take an honest look at ourselves today - for the sake of tomorrow. Who is included? Who is excluded? For the Southern table, what are the implications of obesity? Class, nationality, and sexuality? These are critical issues to ponder. Sustainable South hopes to draw your attention to agricultural groups tackling inclusion and exclusion from the field. Today's contributor is Emilie Dayan, a SFA project manager who blogs weekly about issues of nutrition, sustainability, and food policy in the South.

The VEGGI Farmer’s Cooperative challenges head-on problems of inclusion and exclusion in New Orleans, Louisiana. The cooperative, established following the effects of the BP oil spill on the Vietnamese community in New Orleans East, aims to provide the highest quality local produce and seafood to Crescent City and beyond.

The story of this community goes back to 1975 when, after the fall of Saigon, the Archdiocese of New Orleans invited many of the Christian Vietnamese who supported the U.S.-allied government to seek asylum in Louisiana. There, the Vietnamese found a familiar climate and jobs as fishermen, a trade many had practiced in Vietnam.
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