July 28th, 2011
03:45 PM ET
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Are your tastes on the wild side? If you have the chance to venture on up to Alaska, you just might be in luck.

iReporter Jack Lanam is a 36 year old U.S. Army Civilian working as a Information Technology Specialist in Fairbanks, Alaska. While he says that city fare in the nation's northernmost state is pretty much the same as anywhere, with outposts of chain restaurants like McDonald's, Burger King, Carl's Jr. and Chili's, further into the wilderness, things get a little gamey. As in big game like moose, bear and reindeer.
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Filed under: Alaska • America • Destination Adventure • Inuit • iReport • Travel


July 11th, 2011
09:15 AM ET
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Food says so much about where you’ve come from, where you’ve decided to go, and the lessons you’ve learned. It’s geography, politics, tradition, belief and so much more and this week, we invite you to dig in and discover the rich, ever-evolving taste of America in 2011. The week will culminate with a Secret Supper in New York City, and Eatocracy invites you to participate online starting Monday July 11th at 6:30 p.m. E.T.

On maps, New York’s 7 train links Midtown Manhattan with Flushing in Queens, but it really connects New Yorkers from all over the world: so much so that the city has dubbed it the “International Express.” In 2000, it was named a National Millennium Trail, in recognition of its serving as “a metaphor for the migration of all the world’s people to America’s shores.”

Most of its stops are in Queens, which is one of the most diverse counties in the United States. 47 percent of the population was born outside the United States. This migration has brought with it a huge number of excellent restaurants, and the 7 train is a passport to eating all the way around the world.
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Filed under: 100 Places to Eat • America • Cultural Identity • Culture • New York • Travel


People of America, here's your culinary history on a plate
July 7th, 2011
01:15 PM ET
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After opening more than ten restaurants encompassing Spanish, Greek, Turkish and Mexican cuisines, receiving the prestigious James Beard Award and popularizing tapas for Beltway patrons, Chef Jose Andres has a new role as culinary historian.

"I'm going back to 16th, 17th, 18th-century books, because books to me are a very important way to say, 'This began here on that date and this is the first book that ever published that recipe with corn or that recipe with pawpaw," said Andres gesturing to an imaginary book in his hand.
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Berrong on Beer – Going big on West Coast brews
June 27th, 2011
09:45 AM ET
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Nathan Berrong works at CNN's satellite desk and this is the second installment of his beer column. Drink up.

The United States is filled with amazing breweries, but to me, you can’t begin to talk about beer in America without starting out West. Maybe it’s the climate that is ideal for growing hops, or the beautiful scenery that inspires the brewers, or the diverse culture that promotes creativity. Whatever it is, I say there’s no debating that the best region for beer in the United States is the Pacific or West Coast region.

West Coast beers, plainly put, are massive beers. Massive beers that are bursting with flavor, typically high in alcohol, and have unusual names like “Serpent’s Stout” and “Monk’s Blood”. The staple West Coast beer is the hop heavy, India Pale Ale. Commonly referred to as the IPA, it is also a very common beer style across the country, as nearly every brewery in the US has their own version of it. But, no one brews them better than Sierra Nevada in Chico, California, which has been brewing amazing IPAs for over 30 years, long before the craft beer explosion began.
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Filed under: America • Beer • Berrong on Beer • Best in Life • Pacific Northwest • Sip • Travel • West Coast


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