She's on a kimchi mission
August 7th, 2014
07:45 AM ET
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For Hannah Chung, at least one element of her parents' culture was something of an acquired taste.
Kimchi - a pungent blend of fermented vegetables and spices - is a staple of the Korean table, and is typically offered amid a series of banchan, or free side dishes that are meant to accompany and complement the main dish.

But for Chung, it was a dish that made her feel removed from the dominant culture, not included.

"I actually rebelled against my parents by refusing to eat kimchi sometimes, and I've actually found out that that's a super common experience among second-generation Koreans," she says.

"I got made fun of for all the foods I ate," Chung, a second-generation Korean-American, recalls. "I didn't want to invite my friends over to my house because my house smelled like kimchi and Korean food, and it was really embarrassing for me."

Read more at Eatocracy's new home on CNN.com

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Filed under: Cultural Identity • Culture • Korea • Korean


July 30th, 2014
09:30 AM ET
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If you're wary of chicken and beef products after a major meat supply scandal in Asia, the McDonald's in Japan could have an alternative for you - tofu and fish nuggets.

On Wednesday, McDonald's in Japan rolled out Tofu Shinjo McNuggets, a doppelganger of the Chicken McNugget made from a mishmash of minced white fish, tofu and vegetables including edamame, soy beans and carrots. Deep-fried to a golden-brown and shaped just like the original chicken version, the Tofu Shinjo McNugget is crispy on the outside and mushy on the inside.

The fast food chain is known for adding dishes with local flavor to its menu; for instance McDonald's India has the McAloo Tikki sandwich which caters to vegetarian patrons with its potato and peas patty, and gazpacho in Spain.
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Filed under: Fast Food • Japan • McDonald's • Travel


July 29th, 2014
09:00 AM ET
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Palm weevils. To look at, these tiny bugs are relatively unassuming, perhaps even slightly creepy to the insect-adverse. To Mohammed Ashour, however, they are the solution to many of the ills facing the developing world. The humble palm weevil could potentially eradicate world hunger and malnutrition, it could lift whole communities out of poverty, and bring down global C02 levels. For a creature measuring just a few inches in length, that's a lot of power.

"If anything, our business model is too disruptive," says Ashour, who launched Aspire with four fellow MBA students from McGill University. Their aim is to introduce insect farming to countries with an affinity for insect consumption and a lack of access to nutritional sustenance.
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Filed under: Africa • Food Politics • Hunger


July 9th, 2014
11:45 AM ET
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(Travel + Leisure) Talk about pigs: Americans ate 1.1 billion bacon servings during the 12-month period ending April 2014, about 6 percent more than the previous year, according to market research firm the NPD Group.

We’re not just eating more bacon, we’re also making better bacon (consider the proliferation of artisanal bacons and chefs curing their own bacon in house) and finding creative ways to enjoy it. There’s bacon butter, bacon soda, bacon-infused booze, and bacon ice cream, to name a few inspired iterations.

New York’s BarBacon is entirely devoted to porky provisions, especially the country’s best bacons, which can be paired with flights of craft beer or bourbon. You can get your bacon to go, as at Bacon Bacon, a popular food truck that roams the San Francisco Bay Area delivering bacon-fried chicken, bacon burgers, and bacon, belly, and butt tacos.

There are dedicated bacon brunches and bacon happy hours, and even a bacon challenge. At Paddy Long’s in Chicago, many have tried (and most have failed) to consume the famous five-pound bacon-wrapped bomb in 45 minutes or less.

Eating bacon doesn’t have to be a sport though. Bacon goes haute at Nashville’s Bound’ry, where it is dehydrated, pulverized, and used as a faux breadcrumb for a fried tomato salad. And it joins forces with another, if improbable, food trend—toast—when paired with puréed peas, mint, and olive oil at Vernick Food & Drink in Philadelphia.

In short, if you’ve thought of a way to consume bacon, we guarantee you someone else has, too. Here, an ode to America’s bacon mania.
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Filed under: 100 Places to Eat • Bacon • Meat • Restaurants • Travel


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