October 24th, 2013
06:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Editor's note: Keri Gans is a registered dietitian/nutritionist, media personality, author of "The Small Change Diet" and spokeswoman for Aetna's "What's Your Healthy?" campaign.

Your mom probably never gave you better advice than when she said, "Eat your fruits and veggies."

But eating healthy may seem harder come fall, when favorite produce options dwindle and less familiar ones appear.

Never fear. Now that warm months are gone - and with them the berries, corn and other produce we find easier to incorporate into our diets - a new menu of foods is available to keep you healthy and happy.
FULL POST



In the dead of winter, orange you glad for clementines?
November 27th, 2012
09:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Here in the cold, dark, horrible nub end months of the year, I jam clementines into my mouth like it's my job. Two, four, six at a sitting, I'll dig the edge of my least-ragged nail into the rind and claw away the loose skin to reveal the dewy, seedless segments inside. Rinds pile up in pungent heaps on every flat surface around me - exoskeletons shed by sweet-blooded alien insects that have come to Earth to lift me from my seasonal funk.

I'd stop and take them to a trash bin, but that would mean precious seconds not spent stuffing oranges into my face in the manner of a crazed bonobo. I will set upon a cheap, plywood crate or red net sack full of clementines and dispatch quarters, thirds, halves at a time until there is nothing left but a fine mist of citrus oil coating all nearby surfaces like a cheery arterial spray.

I am certain it is horrifying to watch, and it is in the best interest of all my personal and professional relationships that these little fruits are only available for a brief period each winter.
FULL POST



November 6th, 2012
04:00 PM ET
Share this on:

The Wall Street Journal labeled it a “Halloween horror story.” The Internet called it something else: a “pumpkin panic.”

During the first week of October, the Journal reported that Starbucks stores around the country were running out of the syrup used to make its Pumpkin Spice Latte — one of several fall drinks the chain releases seasonally, for a limited time.

Customers, like those who frequent StarbucksGossip.com, were shocked.

“WHAT IS HAPPENING?” wrote one user.

The answer is simple.
FULL POST



Ears to you, summer corn!
June 19th, 2012
04:30 PM ET
Share this on:

Scorpacciata is a term that means consuming large amounts of a particular local ingredient while it's in season. It's a good way to eat. David LeFevre is the executive chef and co-owner of Manhattan Beach Post in Manhattan Beach, California.

Like Garrison Keillor said, “Sex is good, but not as good as fresh sweet corn."

Sweet corn evokes memories of my summers on the East Coast with my grandfather and the wonderful meals that my grandmother would make with the corn that my grandfather and I had picked, shucked and cooked.

When corn season comes around, it is always an exciting time in the restaurant. We focus on a few key things when we are cooking with corn: the best quality product, a fresh product, minimal cooking time so as to not lose the fresh sweet flavor, proper technique, and making sure to remember it’s a fun, down-and-dirty experience to eat it.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Bite • Corn • Ingredients • Make • Recipes • Scorpacciata • Summer Vegetables • Vegetables


May 23rd, 2012
08:15 PM ET
Share this on:



Vidalia onions - accept no impostors
May 15th, 2012
04:45 PM ET
Share this on:

Wynn Westmoreland is Georgia born and bred, and she knows from Vidalia onions. And yes, she does say "y'all" a lot.

Hey y’all, it’s Vidalia onion time. And that is big time. What other onion has its own museum, state and federal law of protection, festival, YouTube channel, website, Facebook page and Twitter account?

The Vidalia actually started as a fluke as farmers in the Depression tried different crops. In a small section of Georgia with the right soil contents, an onion grew that wasn’t hot but very sweet. Folks flipped over them and soon word of those sweet onions from Georgia got out.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Alliums • Ingredients • Scorpacciata • Spring Vegetables • Vegetables


April 24th, 2012
11:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Scorpacciata is a term that means consuming large amounts of a particular local ingredient while it's in season. It's a good way to eat.

In theory, it's spring today. Not that you'd be able to tell it from the weather, which seems unable to decide between parboiling and deep-freezing various chunks of the country, but I'm clinging on to a few telltale signs at the farmers market and in produce aisles.

While summer's sumptuous heirloom tomatoes and versatile, velvety okra are undeniably wonderful, spring's unique bounty feeds my senses and my soul. After a season of hearty, dense, nourishing and occasionally dull root vegetables, the earth is coming to life again in a riot of color and flavor. Might as well celebrate over dinner.
FULL POST



5@5 - Eat your greens
January 20th, 2012
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

(Left to right: Christophe Hille is the Chief Operating Officer, Hadley Schmitt  is the Executive Chef, and Chris Ronis is the Managing Partner of Northern Spy Food Co. in New York, New York.)

There’s much high-minded talk in the food world about eating “mostly plants” (per Mr. Michael Pollan’s counsel), but judging from the slick of animal grease on our collective food biz lips, we’re deep in the throes of a meat moment. Meatballs, meatopias, and meat weeks; the cottage industry of top-ten burger lists (as a college professor once said to me in a different context, “I think we’ve taken enough rides on that pony”); and around every corner, another young cook with tattoos of cleavers, solemnly cutting up a pig (note to the non-cook reader: it’s not that hard.)

Our mid-winter redemption for editorial and gustatory carno-chauvinism lies in greenery. Dark, sulfurous, bitter greens, to excise the sins of the flesh and remind ourselves that while any shoemaker with salt, a Boston butt and an oven can make a passable pulled pork sandwich, it is through vegetables that cooks show intelligence and intuition.

To wit: five different ways to eat your greens this winter (not necessarily vegetarian, mind you). The methods are adapted from things currently or recently on our menu at Northern Spy, which in no way means that they’re inviolable. Mess ‘em up. Put the kale where the chard goes and vice versa.

Five Ways to Cook and Eat Dark Greens in Winter
FULL POST



November 2nd, 2011
10:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Now's the time to heap your plate full of beets, broccoli, apples, chestnuts, kale, potatoes, pumpkin, winter squash, cabbage, citrus and artichokes while they're in peak season. Why? It's just more delicious that way.

Don't like broccoli? Give it a roast

How to roast butternut squash

Make the most of fall squash

Pumpkin beyond the pie

Posted by:
Filed under: Eatocracy TV • Fall Vegetables • Greens • Ingredients • Make • Scorpacciata • Squash • Television • Vegetables • Video


Pinterest
Archive
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
| Part of