April 1st, 2014
02:00 PM ET
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You know the saying, "An apple a day keeps the doctor away"? Turns out eating one apple isn't enough. A new study suggests people who eat up to seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day can cut their risk of death by 42% – and that vegetables may be more important than fruit to your overall health.

The study, conducted by scientists in the United Kingdom, was published online Monday in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.
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Filed under: Eating Habits • Food as Medicine • Fruit • Health News • Ingredients • Vegetables


March 18th, 2014
10:30 AM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full­time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most­ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Here at America’s Test Kitchen, we never shy away from getting down to the nitty-gritty science of why a recipe works, and we’re constantly questioning the most basic assumptions about the best way to cook a dish. So when we were developing a quinoa pilaf for our January/February 2014 issue of Cook’s Illustrated, we went back to the most elementary step of the process: cooking the quinoa.

And we realized that most people have been doing it all wrong.
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March 7th, 2014
08:00 AM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full­time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most­ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Roasting beef makes for elegant entrees and, if you’re lucky, leftovers that practically beg to be turned into sandwiches. But making roast beef can be tricky; it’s easy to overcook the meat or to insufficiently brown the exterior, a key step if you’re trying to develop the deepest flavor possible (which you should be).

Here at America’s Test Kitchen, we’ve developed dozens of roast beef recipes, so we know exactly what can go wrong and, more importantly, how to ensure that everything goes right. Here’s all the knowledge we’ve gained after spending years creating roast beef recipes for everything from inexpensive sirloin roasts to pricey beef tenderloins.
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Filed under: America's Test Kitchen • Content Partner • Ingredients • Meat • Recipes


February 12th, 2014
01:00 AM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

All chocolate starts with the cacao bean. From there, different processing, flavorings, ingredients, and percentages of cocoa solids and cocoa butter can produce chocolate of all sorts. Here’s a sampler of 12.
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January 23rd, 2014
04:00 PM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

All the world loves a sausage, so whether you grew up in Brooklyn or Bologna, you probably have a favorite. Here are some of ours:

Frankfurter: Top Dog

The genuine article, the Frankfurter, hails from Germany. But America adopted it and made it the most famous sausage in the world. Hot dogs are made from beef (sometimes combined with pork), which is cured, smoked, cooked, and seasoned with coriander, garlic, ground mustard, nutmeg, salt, sugar, and white pepper. Although hot dogs are fully cooked, warm them by steaming, boiling, sautéing, or grilling (we prefer the last two, which make for crisp skins). All-beef dogs with little or no sugar taste meaty and real. The test kitchen favorite is Nathan’s Famous Beef Franks.
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December 2nd, 2013
10:15 AM ET
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It's as red as blood and, for the traditional Hungarian chef, no less essential for a healthy life.

But humble paprika - national spice and integral to all the most treasured Hungarian dishes - has been having a rough time.

Hungarian paprika production has slumped as buyers across the world have turned to cheaper supplies from Spain, China and Latin America.

And two years of unpredictable weather in Hungary may mean this year's crop of capsicum annuum peppers - the raw ingredient of paprika - is the poorest in 50 years.

Horror of horrors, Hungary may even resort to importing the crop.
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Filed under: Hungarian • Spices


November 15th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
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Britain's Princess Anne says an increase in the value of horse meat could result in better welfare for horses.
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Filed under: Animal Rights • Food Politics • Horse • Meat


November 12th, 2013
12:30 AM ET
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Editor's Note: America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook’s Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

What one line do you find in nearly every savory recipe? “Season with salt and pepper.”

But not all salts and peppers are created equal. Here are 12 we like to cook with.

Sea Salt
Most sea salt comes from seawater held in large, shallow ponds or large pans. As the water evaporates—naturally or by heating—coarse salt crystals fall to the bottom. The crystals are then collected by raking. We sprinkle sea salt on salad, meat, and cooked vegetables just before serving so that it maintains its satisfying crunch. Our favorite, Maldon Sea Salt, has especially delicate, crunchy flakes.
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November 8th, 2013
08:45 AM ET
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It's a meticulous harvest which forbids the use of a spade, let alone tractors.

Crouched deep within a field full of purple crocuses, groups of villagers come together every year for a back-breaking fortnight, harvesting saffron.

With great precision, and grubby fingernails, flowers containing the rare, precious spice are snapped away from the stems and dropped inside white buckets.
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Filed under: Big Business • Business and Farming News • Farms • Greece • Spices


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