April 18th, 2014
02:00 PM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full­time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most­ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Easter wouldn’t be Easter without a glorious ham centerpiece for your dinner table. That is why we’re presenting you with our delicious, beautiful crumb-coated ham. It doesn’t require much work, packs tons of flavor, boasts tender, juicy meat and looks impressive enough to wow your hungry guests.

When developing the recipe for our Crumb-Coated Baked Ham, we found that getting both crispy crumbs and a moist ham at the same time turned out to be a bit of a challenge. We tackled this problem by starting the ham out in an oven bag. We bake the spiral-cut ham under - not in - the bag so we can easily pull it off and apply the coating once the meat is warmed through. Cooking down the spicy-sweet glaze on the stovetop makes it super-concentrated - all the better to cling to the crumb coating. We found that panko bread crumbs stayed the crunchiest, and we season them simply, with salt, pepper and fresh parsley.
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Filed under: America's Test Kitchen • Content Partner • Easter • Easter • Holiday • Holidays • Make • Recipes


April 18th, 2014
01:00 PM ET
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French fashion designers don't hold a monopoly on haute.

Every April the country's top pâtissiers and chocolatiers prove they can be just as outlandish as they unveil their annual collection of chocolate Easter eggs.

These edible delights take countless forms.

Master pâtissier Christophe Roussel looked east when creating "Sweet Japon," a sushi plate made entirely of chocolate, chocolate paste, marzipan and nougat.

Chopsticks allow chocoholics to dip their sugary maki and sushi in salted butter caramel.
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Filed under: Chocolate • Easter • Holidays


Gee, this wine tastes hamtastic!
April 18th, 2014
01:45 AM ET
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Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

Easter and ham. Sure, there are plenty of people whose idea of Easter dinner is roasting up an herb–crusted leg of lamb (or chowing down on a bucketful of Peeps), but if you ask me, ham is the classic Easter food. The rest of the country seems to agree—U.S. ham sales climb to 10 times normal during the week leading up to Easter.
 
This situation, of course, leads to the question: What wine do you pair with ham? The answer is easier once you know a couple of the basic facts about pairing wine and food, specifically regarding salt.
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Filed under: Content Partner • Easter • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine


Lotsa matzo! Great new Jewish restaurants
April 16th, 2014
12:30 AM ET
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Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

The history of Jewish cooking is long. Almost as long is the history of jokes about Jewish cooking. (A bad matzo ball makes a good paperweight. Hahahahaha.)

Just about everyone—with the possible exception of Jewish food joke writers—will be glad to hear that we’re in a new era of Jewish cuisine. No offense to anyone’s grandmother, but several places are using well-sourced ingredients to make superior versions of brisket, babka, and of course, matzo balls.

Here they are, the great new Jewish culinary destinations. When you visit, remember this piece of classic Jewish humor: Never leave a restaurant empty-handed.
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