October 29th, 2013
07:15 PM ET
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It’s not exactly where you’d expect to find a bake sale - in an old warehouse, down a damp cobbled street in London’s East End. But then, it’s no ordinary bake sale.

Just in time for Halloween, a group of London cake makers have made it their task to create some of the most disgusting-looking, unappetizing cakes imaginable.

Anybody fancy a tentacle flapjack, or a bleeding wound cupcake? How about a chocolate severed hand, a scarred flesh rocky road, or an oozing eyeball? Didn’t think so.
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Filed under: Cake • Dessert • Dishes • Halloween • Stunt


Dessert debate: cake vs pie
October 14th, 2013
12:00 PM ET
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Each autumn, some of the world's most prominent food scholars, chefs, journalists and enthusiasts gather together on the campus of the University of Mississippi for a symposium on the state of Southern food. Overarching themes covered by the Southern Foodways Alliance in the previous 15 years have included the role of farmers, a study of global influences, the undercurrents of music and booze, just to name a few. The subject at the core of 2013's installment: Women at Work.

For two days, featured presenters and honorees like Diane Roberts, Vertamae Grosvenor, Emily Wallace, Candacy Taylor, Charlotte Druckman, among many others, spoke eloquently and enthusiastically of the essential roles that women have played in the creation of Southern food culture past and present.

Then it was time for dessert. Eatocracy's managing editor Kat Kinsman and New York Times Atlanta bureau chief Kim Severson faced off in a tongue-in-cheek Lincoln-Douglas debate. The topic at hand: which holds more essential social and emotional currency in the South, pie or cake?

Kinsman defended the pro-pie position, and Severson took the side of cake. They tied, by an assessment of audience applause, but here in the spirit of National Dessert Day, we're serving up slices of both their arguments. Dig in.
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October 14th, 2013
12:00 PM ET
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When the love child of the doughnut and the croissant was created by the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York, fans queued for hours to sample the tasty hybrid snack.

With only 300 cronuts made each day sold at $5 a pop, they are so coveted that they can go for up to $40 on the pastry black market. Even supermodel Heidi Klum had to wait weeks to try one.

Though the cronut has gained worldwide attention on social media since its debut in May, few in the UK have had the chance to taste the unique pastry - until now.

Read - Cronut mania spreads to London



What to drink with dessert
September 9th, 2013
09:15 AM ET
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Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

It’s quite something to take a brisk walk on a cool September morning through Soho in New York City and come across a line of at least 150 people waiting patiently for the opportunity to buy a cronut. For me at least, the sight of all these cronut-loons raises a number of questions. One is, “Really? That’s how you’re going to spend your morning?” Another is, “Wow, is civilization doomed?” Then there’s the crucially important, “Gosh, I wonder what wine would go with a cronut?”
 
As I am never going to have a cronut - because the hour I’d spend in line to get one would be an hour I would never get back, which I could have spent doing something more exciting, like watching water drip - that last question will remain hypothetical. But it does bring up the question of dessert wines in general.
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Filed under: Content Partner • Dessert • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine


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