Gather ye cheese curds while ye may
August 7th, 2014
07:40 AM ET
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It's not long now. The end of summer. That's not bad news for everyone. Fall fashion fans. Parents who have spent enough quality time with their kids. Halloween enthusiasts.

But it is the last chance to savor some amazing foods that will be gone when summer is over, or not long afterward. Here are some things to try before it's too late.

Read more at Eatocracy's new home on CNN.com



Sweet success for syrup-making retirees
August 7th, 2014
07:30 AM ET
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Berryville, Virginia (CNN) - Travis and Joyce Miller might have the most fragrant garage in the Shenandoah Valley.

The heady scent of hickory wood wafts from their rural home on Virginia's busy Route 7, catching the attention of hungry commuters who might expect to find a grandma tending the hearth or, even better, a pitmaster roasting a hog on the side of the road.

What's cooking, though, is something a little bit sweeter (sorry, grandma): It's Falling Bark Farm hickory syrup.

Never heard of hickory syrup? Neither had the Millers until a few years ago when a chance Internet search turned up mentions of it.

In 2011, they showed up to the farmers market in nearby Purcellville, Virginia, with 48 bottles of their new science project - "which we felt was a little bit risky," Travis says.

Read more at the all-new Eatocracy.com



August 5th, 2014
10:00 AM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-­time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most­ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Eggs Benedict relies on two tricky egg-based components—poached eggs and hollandaise sauce. If you follow our method for poaching eggs, the first part is easy. Adding vinegar to the water helps to set the whites and prevents feathery whites. Cracking the eggs into the teacups and gently sliding the eggs into the salted, acidulated water ensures they all go into the water at the same time—so they all are done at the same time.

Water temperature is key when poaching eggs. We bring the water to a boil and turn off the heat. We add the eggs and then quickly cover the pan. The gentle residual heat produces restaurant-worthy poached eggs with soft, runny yolks and perfectly formed, round whites.
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Filed under: America's Test Kitchen • Breakfast • Content Partner • Dishes • Eggs


July 25th, 2014
11:15 AM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-­time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most­ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Despite the cozy image conjured by the name, few people actually make home fries at home, probably because the dish calls for more time, elbow grease, and stovetop space than most cooks care to devote. We wanted nicely crisped home fries with tender interiors that would serve six to eight hungry people—and wouldn’t chain the cook to the stove for an hour. Because if you’re making a beautiful batch of perfectly scrambled eggs, you probably need some equally good potatoes to go alongside.

Since time was a priority, we decided to parcook the spuds before roasting them in the oven. Parcooking would dramatically cut down on roasting time, while finishing them in the oven would allow us to make a big batch.
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Filed under: America's Test Kitchen • Breakfast • Content Partner • Dishes • Potatoes • T1


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