Cherokee seed project sows respect for the past, hope for the future
January 16th, 2014
02:00 AM ET
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The Cherokee Indians are preserving the roots of their heritage with a program that allows officially recognized members of the tribe to access seeds that are unique to the Cherokee Nation.

Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Bill John Baker explained the seeds' lineage to CNN. "This strain of seeds came with us on the Trail of Tears," he said, referring to the forced migration of Cherokee nation from their land east of the Mississippi to an area that is now Oklahoma. The 15,000-person march took place in 1838 and 1839 under Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, and resulted in the deaths of an estimated 4000 Cherokees, due to starvation and sickness.

"They have been preserved and grown every year before that, and they are the basic foods God gave us that we grew long before the contact with Europeans," Baker continued.
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January 14th, 2014
06:00 PM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

It’s hard enough to cook chicken properly on the stovetop or in the oven, where you have complete control of the temperature, but in a slow cooker (see which models we recommend in our equipment testing) it’s even trickier to ensure moist, flavorful chicken at the end of a long cooking time. We’ve seen soups and stews full of dry shredded chicken and braised breasts and thighs that were bland and unappealing. Here is what we’ve learned about getting juicy, flavorful chicken from a slow cooker.
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Lose weight now, ask the Bible how
January 10th, 2014
01:45 PM ET
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Kate Krader (@kkrader on Twitter) is Food & Wine's restaurant editor. When she tells us where to find our culinary heart's desire, we listen up.

Happy This Year! If, like me, you’ve already broken a few of your resolutions, you might be done with new diets in 2014.
 
If, however, your will to lose weight is stronger than ever, US News & World Report has some helpful intel. It ranked 32 current diets for effectiveness and simplicity, naming the DASH Diet (developed to fight high blood pressure; the focus is on fruits, vegetables, lean protein, low-fat dairy) and the TLC Diet (focusing on increasing fiber intake and cutting back on saturated fat) as the winners.

Tied at the bottom of the list are the Dukan Diet (the super-strict high-protein diet that claims you’ll lose 10 pounds in the first week) and the Paleo Diet (followers eat like cavemen: lots of meat, fish and vegetables; not a lot of refined sugar, beans, grains).
 
And then there are a few new weight loss plans that somehow missed the rankings, like the Mushroom Diet and the God Diet. Read on to learn how to lose weight according to the Old Testament.
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Filed under: Content Partner • Diet Tools • Diets • Food and Wine • Religion • Trends


January 8th, 2014
01:00 PM ET
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America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook’s Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

No disrespect to the usual hot chocolate, but once you’ve tasted a cup made with honest-to-goodness chocolate, as opposed to cocoa, you’ll never go back. It makes the richest, creamiest, most decadent hot chocolate going. There’s only one drawback: It’s not as convenient as instant cocoa. We were determined to change that.
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January 6th, 2014
06:00 AM ET
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Dorothy Guy remembers when Braddock, Pennsylvania, was a thriving steel town humming with streetcars and commerce where her father, a foundry worker, and mother raised a happy family.

Every other Thursday - “steel mill payday” - her family went grocery shopping at the A&P or Kroger. For the occasional post-church treat, she recalls trips to Isaly’s for a skyscraper cone or a chipped ham BBQ sandwich.

“Braddock was really alive back then,” said Guy, 63, a lifelong resident who’s raising seven grandchildren there.

That was before the steel industry’s decline in the 1970s. Since then, the 20,000-person population of Braddock’s heyday has dried up to around 2,300, and this former metropolis on the Monongahela River east of Pittsburgh has fallen into urban decay. Save for a handful of markets, convenience stores and a cafe, there are no grocery stores or restaurants within the city limits of Braddock, Guy says.

But Braddock Mayor John Fetterman is hoping to change that with the help of Kevin Sousa, a Pittsburgh-area chef known for starting businesses in neighborhoods that have seen better days. And, they’re looking to Kickstarter to fund their big idea.
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December 12th, 2013
01:30 PM ET
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CNN photojournalist John Bodnar is a second-generation Slavic-American whose grandparents emigrated from Eastern Slovakia, and his mother’s Carpatho-Rusyn ethnicity is the prominent influence for his cultural and family traditions. Previously, he wrote about haluski, holupki and paska.

I’ve always enjoyed the Slovak food my mother and extended family prepares. We eat these dishes at every family gathering: weddings, funerals and holiday celebrations. We eagerly approach the buffet display to find the holupki and haluski that usually occupy the first few trays, but at the end of the tables are the treats.

Cookies and cakes dominate that section, but the pastry that has always delighted my palate is the kolachi nut roll. Kolachi (sometimes spelled "kolache") is the name often given to a standard type of Slavic dough-filled pastry. Our kolachi is rolled dough filled with a walnut mixture, but other families fill theirs with a poppy seed mixture.

My aunt Eleanor was always celebrated as the one whose recipe held the quality edge over the other family members'. Obviously, this unofficial title has been disputed, but I concede that hers had a slight advantage in my childhood memories.

But Eleanor’s health eventually left her unable to make the delicious kolachi. As her health was failing, she insisted that her daughter Renee learn her kolachi recipe and carry on the tradition and her legacy. My cousin Renee embraced her mother’s challenge, and carries, in my mind, the title for making the best kolachi nut roll.
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Filed under: Baked Goods • Christmas • Cookies • Cooking • Cultural Identity • Culture • Family Recipe Index • Holidays • Make • Recipes • Step-by-Step


Off the menu - being rude to service workers
December 2nd, 2013
03:30 PM ET
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An old acquaintance of mine was fond of saying that after a person hits 30, the only one who has any business yelling at them is their romantic partner. I'm personally not a fan of marital histrionics, either, but I certainly appreciate the sentiment. Especially when the ire is directed toward people who are just trying to do their jobs.

But is loudly shaming those shamers the optimal solution?

If you managed to crawl out of your tryptophan haze long enough to look at the internet this holiday weekend, you almost surely came across the Tweeted tale of Elan Gale and "Diane in 7A." Gale, a producer for ABC's The Bachelor, allegedly found himself on a Phoenix-bound flight with a medical mask-wearing woman who, by his account (which he later revealed on Twitter to be a hoax), was being rude to the airline staff. In the exchange, he decided to take a stand and call her out on her behavior.
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November 25th, 2013
10:00 PM ET
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Lopburi, Thailand, is famous for the small but feisty - and sometimes downright vicious - long-tailed macaques that live among its ancient temples and can often be seen creating mischief in the streets. The town throws an annual "monkey buffet," which gives the animals a chance to gorge on over 2,000 kilograms of fruits, vegetables and other treats like candy and soda.
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Filed under: Pets • Weird News


November 25th, 2013
01:15 PM ET
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At any given Ole Miss home game, longtime tailgater Keith Henley lays out pewter serving trays and chafing dishes. Under the cover of two 10-by-20-foot tents in the wooded center of his alma mater's campus, known as The Grove, Henley busies himself with the service. At the same time, his brother and stepbrother fill it with exquisite dishes of wild boar loin or grilled elk wrapped in bacon with cream cheese.

They bring along a generator so the flat-screen television and lamps work. The tables are covered in cloths embroidered with "Hotty Toddy" and finished off with elaborate centerpieces full of flowers - sometimes augmented by Jack Daniels bottles glued to wooden dowels. They'll taste bourbon balls from their tailgating neighbors, with whom they've long exchanged Christmas cards.
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Filed under: Sports • Tailgating


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