November 23rd, 2012
03:15 PM ET
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Have you ever considered the architecture of a coffee cup lid? Or the aerodynamics involved in a Pringles can? Did you know that microwaves were invented using technology developed during World War II?

We don’t often stop and think about the stories behind these items we see every day. A new exhibit at Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, FOOD: Transforming the American Table, aims to illuminate America’s relationship with food by taking a look back at food history from 1950-2000.
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Filed under: Business and Farming News • Culture • Food History • Food Science • News • Nostalgia • Supermarkets


August 15th, 2012
12:15 PM ET
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Today would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday, and Eatocracy is celebrating her legacy.

The setting is so inviting that you're almost compelled to plop yourself down in a chair for a kitchen coffee klatsch.

Except you can't. Because it's behind glass.

Julia Child's kitchen is back at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History after seven months of renovations. For the 100th anniversary of her birth, the museum is temporarily unwrapping a new space dedicated to the beloved television chef, which includes the kitchen from her Cambridge, Massachusetts home.
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Filed under: Celebrity Chefs • Culture • Food History • Julia Child


Wife stealing, compulsive chewing and artisanal carving – the cool history of ice in America
August 10th, 2012
02:00 PM ET
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I have a problem. It's called pagophagia. I'm a compulsive ice eater.

While some people may crave chocolate and others can't function without coffee, my vice is ice. I'm not alone.

Recently, I was in the CNN cafeteria filling four (count 'em, four) 32-ounce cups chock full of ice (my morning ice run). A woman approached me and said, "Ah! Someone else who's crazy about ice!" She then pointed to a co-worker at the salad bar and said, "We meet up here each day to get our ice together."

Kumbaya! I had found more of my people, and we bonded over the ice machine.
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Filed under: Bars • Culture • Food History • Obsessions • Sip


Fire in the belly - evidence suggests early man may have cooked
April 2nd, 2012
03:15 PM ET
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You may be clueless about how to start a fire in the wilderness without matches or a lighter, but our ancestors may have figured it out long ago.

Scientists have uncovered evidence that humans used fire at least 1 million years ago, potentially for cooking purposes. The findings are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Michael Chazon of the University of Toronto led an investigation into the Wonderwerk Cave in South Africa. The team found burned bones and ash plant material, including grasses, leaves and twigs. The bones originated from a variety of animals: small rodents, antelopes and horselike mammals.

Read - Scientists find signs of ancient man-made fire

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Filed under: Culture • Food History • Food Science


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