Grenades and gravy – cooking in the Korean War
November 11th, 2011
09:00 AM ET
Share this on:

For most veterans of the Korean War, "SOS" has nothing to do with saving a ship.

I've heard the stories from my grandparents about eating "S*** On a Shingle" during their military service. I don't recall whether my Grandma Mouton, an Air Force veteran, ever made it for me as a kid. If she did, I've blocked it out with fond memories of snickerdoodles, fried egg sandwiches, and late-night french toast.

I don't think my Grandpa Mouton can do the same. As a Korean War Army vet, SOS probably haunts him in his dreams.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Cook • Food History • History • Military • Veterans Day


South America's pisco enjoys North American revival
October 11th, 2011
09:10 AM ET
Share this on:

Take one part pub crawl and one part contest mixed vigorously with 10 bartenders on a mini bus, and what do you get? One spirited competition to determine who makes the best drink using pisco, the South American brandy making a comeback in the United States.

Long a fixture in liquor cabinets and bars in Peru and Chile, pisco is popping up in the United States amid an obsession with craft cocktails. From January to July, export sales of the South American grape brandy grew to $2.3 million, up 139% over the same period in 2010, fueled by increased sales in the United States, Peruvian news agency Andina reports.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Cocktail Recipes • Culture • Food History • Peru • Sip


KFC honors Colonel who hatched the brand
July 29th, 2011
09:45 AM ET
Share this on:

The Kentucky Fried Chicken Corporation has something to crow about. They've just launched a brand new website in honor of founder Colonel Harland Sanders, and they're inviting his devoted fans to share their stories and memories of the man behind the brand.

“Sanders had an impact on people. They remember that interaction when they met him,” says Rick Maynard, public relations manager of the KFC Corporation.

The idea to start ColonelSanders.com came from a meeting with franchisees who have been with the company for many years. “One day they were all telling these amazing stories of the Colonel. Our goal is to capture the stories before they’re forgotten, “says Maynard.
FULL POST



Celebrating 75 years of the Wienermobile
July 18th, 2011
09:15 AM ET
Share this on:

Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia (CNN) - Driving cross-country in small-bus-size hot dog is kind of a big deal.

Between 1,000 and 1,500 college seniors apply for the 12 posts piloting Oscar Mayer’s six Wienermobiles. Hopefuls have been applying for the position since 1988.

“The lucky dogs who cut the mustard are known as ‘hotdoggers,’ ” said Reese Brammel, a hotdogger who just graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in “Economnomnomics,” according to his bio on the hotdogger blog.

Brammel, who plans to apply to law school after his year-long tenure with Oscar Mayer, will face much more forgiving acceptance rates at even the most selective schools.

Brammel and his co-hotdogger, Lauren Oliver, are part of the 24th class of Oscar Mayer hotdoggers, but the Wienermobile is much older. In fact, it is 75 years old today.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Culture • Food History • Hot dogs


People of America, here's your culinary history on a plate
July 7th, 2011
01:15 PM ET
Share this on:

After opening more than ten restaurants encompassing Spanish, Greek, Turkish and Mexican cuisines, receiving the prestigious James Beard Award and popularizing tapas for Beltway patrons, Chef Jose Andres has a new role as culinary historian.

"I'm going back to 16th, 17th, 18th-century books, because books to me are a very important way to say, 'This began here on that date and this is the first book that ever published that recipe with corn or that recipe with pawpaw," said Andres gesturing to an imaginary book in his hand.
FULL POST



As American as apple pie - the origins of picnic favorites
July 4th, 2011
11:30 AM ET
Share this on:

There's nothing quite so American as gathering your friends and family to celebrate Independence Day with a classic cookout.

We polled Eatocracy readers a while back, and nearly 38,000 votes later, it seems that the ultimate summer menu would consist of a burger (cooked medium and topped with cheese, lettuce and onions), potato salad, corn on the cob and watermelon, washed down with plenty of ice cold beer.

Only in the U.S.A., right?

Well, not quite. While those dishes may now be synonymous with American life, liberty and the pursuit of a really great picnic, like most of the citizens themselves, often their origins are elsewhere.
FULL POST



Liver mush – a North Carolina treat from way back when
June 8th, 2011
07:00 AM ET
Share this on:

This summer, CNN's Defining America project will be traveling the country with the CNN Express bus to explore the stories behind the data and demographics that show how places are changing. This week, CNN brings you coverage from North Carolina.

There was a time when every North Carolina family loved – or at least knew – liver mush. It's the cuisine of grandma's house, snow days and simpler times, a local delicacy some natives defend with the same loyalty they have to Carolina barbecue and Cheerwine.

Back then, it was the economical way to get some meat in your diet when times were tough, a high-iron addition to a kid's lunch, or a fried-till-crispy comfort breakfast beside fat slices of tomato and muskmelon.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Cultural Identity • Culture • Defining America • Food History • North Carolina • Obsessions • Southern • Travel


Lifting the lid on a family tradition
February 23rd, 2011
05:45 PM ET
Share this on:

Cara Reedy is an Executive Assistant at CNN. She previously wrote for Eatocracy on being a small cook in a big kitchen.

I grew up in St. Louis, MO which is considered the Midwest, but has some clear southern leanings. Barbecue and fried chicken were always around. One of my favorite meals as a child was a one-pot meal consisting of potatoes, green beans, carrots and cabbage boiled with a ham hock. My parents served it with a fresh batch of corn bread to soak up the juices - often called pot liquor or potlikker.

I never really thought anything about this meal other than I liked it. When you're a kid, you generally don't analyze your food that deeply. It’s either like or can’t stand. Flash forward to adulthood, when I started doing some personal research on the African American slave diet. I suddenly realized that what my parents were serving was the original soul food.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Black History Month • Cuisines • Culture • Food History • Holidays • Soul


Pinterest
Archive
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
| Part of