In South Africa, bring on the braai
April 17th, 2014
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Barbecued zebra anyone? How about warthog with peri-peri sauce?

Along with more traditional fare, these are the kinds of things you might find on a "braai," a specialized barbecue born of South Africa and over the last couple years seen around the world, thanks to a TV series.

South Africa's braai (barbecue) culture is one of the few things that truly cuts across racial and economic lines - just about every circle of friends here has its own "braai master."

In much the way cupcakes went from being a humble, if beloved, food item to the focus of TV shows, blogs and books, so too the braai has escalated in prominence and caught the imagination of the country in a new way.
FULL POST



January 13th, 2014
08:00 AM ET
Share this on:

In Egypt, the words "street food" and "gourmet" don't often go hand in hand.

Street food is not about style; it's meant to be quick, cheap and filling. However Chris Khalifa, a 30-year-old owner of Zooba cafe in Cairo, has tried to change that.

He saw a trend elsewhere in the world: chefs hit the streets and serve dishes out of food trucks.

"I noticed no one had ever tried to do this with Egyptian street food," said Khalifa. "I try to create a brand around a more gourmet Egyptian street food."
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: African • Cuisines • Egyptian


October 16th, 2013
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

South Africa's unique culture - and complex history - shines through in everything the "rainbow nation" does. Even the country's foodways reflect the diverse demographics of people that call the southernmost point of Africa home.

Before the Suez Canal was excavated, Europeans had to sail around Africa to get to Asia for the silk and spice trades. The journey was so long that explorers often ran out of fresh food and water, resulting in scurvy and oftentimes death.

Coastal city Cape Town was established as a logical restocking point, and was soon settled by a number of different European nationalities, including the Portuguese, Dutch and British.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: African • Anthony Bourdain • Content Partner • Cuisines • Parts Unknown • South African


October 4th, 2013
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Sub-Saharan Africa's economic renaissance is fueling an investment drive by fast food joints looking to tap the continent's growing middle class.

The likes of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) and Domino's pizza are opening up in African growth markets from Nigeria to Angola to give consumers a taste of U.S. cuisine.

Elias Schulze, managing partner of The Africa Group, a boutique Africa-focused investment consultancy, said U.S. takeout stores are rapidly becoming "aspirational brands" for cosmopolitan Africans with disposable income.

He said: "An upwardly mobile, confident, Western-leaning and young consumer class bodes well for an American burger boom."

And the battle for the African market is well underway. This year, Yum! Brands - owner of KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut - is expanding into Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Read - Fast-food giants want pizza the action in Africa

Posted by: ,
Filed under: African • Fast Food


July 22nd, 2013
09:30 AM ET
Share this on:

When Ahmed Jama decided to leave behind the successful restaurant he'd started in London to open a new one in one of the world's most dangerous cities, his hometown of Mogadishu, reactions ranged from surprise to scorn to straightforward questioning of his sanity.

"A lot of people think that I am a crazy guy," says the Somali chef, his wiry figure looming over roasting pans full of vegetables and meat inside his downtown Mogadishu eatery.

"When I opened this restaurant they could not believe it," he remembers. "When I came here and bought the land some people told me, 'you are not coming back, come back when you're ready' - I said, 'I am going to build it soon.'"
FULL POST



July 9th, 2013
02:15 PM ET
Share this on:

While staying in the beach town of Mombasa, Kenya, iReporter Brian Oh biked approximately 15 miles through the countryside to reach this village, where he was offered a traditional Kenyan lunch. He says he was intoxicated by "the fresh smell of soil everywhere and the sweetness of mango and banana on the air. It was serene and almost primeval." After eating the meal with his bare hands, he left the family with $11 equivalent in Kenyan shillings and biked back to his hotel in Mombasa. – jccarp, CNN iReport producer

Oh told iReport:

On a bike ride through the countryside along the coast in Mombasa, Kenya, I had lunch at a local village consisting of a freshly butchered chicken, sukuma wiki (greens prepared with onions and tomatoes), boiled potatoes and plantains, and ugali (corn maize cake).

FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: African • Cuisines • iReport • Kenyan


June 5th, 2013
07:00 PM ET
Share this on:

World-renowned chef, author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain visits the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the next episode of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," airing Sunday, June 9, at 9 p.m. ET. Follow the show on Twitter and Facebook.

"Good food is going to be a challenge soon, so we take the opportunity to fill up on what we can," Anthony Bourdain says, fueling up at a local restaurant before leaving Goma. This city in the Democratic Republic of Congo lies at the foot of the Nyiragongo Volcano and has a population of about one million people - many of whom are internally displaced.

Grilled chicken, ugali and piri piri pepper make “a pretty nice meal," Bourdain finds.

FULL POST



June 4th, 2013
09:30 AM ET
Share this on:

CNN's Nima Elbagir is treated to a traditional meal of roasted goat while visiting with the Maasai of Northern Tanzania.

Read more at CNN Africa

Posted by:
Filed under: African • Cuisines


How the cappuccino conquered South Africa
March 22nd, 2013
06:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Not so long ago, if you ordered a cup of coffee in South Africa you needed to specify "filter" to avoid getting instant.

A decade ago, there was no cafe culture, nowhere to go for a flat white and certainly no expectation of locally roasted beans.

Those days are gone. Specialist coffee shops did nearly four times the business here in 2012 as in 2007.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: African • Coffee • Sip • South Africa • South African


Recent comments
Pinterest
Archive
July 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
| Part of