More people sickened by contaminated sprouts
June 11th, 2014
05:30 PM ET
Share this on:

Seventeen people in five states have been sickened by E. coli after eating clover sprouts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's up from the 10 cases reported by the CDC in late May.

No deaths have been linked to the E. coli outbreak, the CDC says, but nearly half of those sickened were hospitalized. Three cases were identified in Idaho, one in Michigan, two in Montana, one in Utah and 10 in Washington state.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: E. coli • Food Safety • Health News • Tainted Food


June 11th, 2014
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

America's Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full¬time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most¬ foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen's online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook's Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

Vinaigrette may be the most useful sauce in any cook's repertoire, because in addition to dressing greens, it can be used as sauce for chicken, fish, and vegetables that have been grilled, poached, or steamed.

The ingredient list is short and method is simple. So what's the problem? Basic vinaigrette doesn't stay together. By the time you pour it over greens and get the salad to the table, this emulsified sauce has broken and you end up with overly vinegary and oily bites of salad. Which is where our recipe for a foolproof dressing that won't break comes in.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: America's Test Kitchen • Condiment • Content Partner • Dishes • Ingredients • Salad


Catch up with the tomato-based car of the future
June 11th, 2014
11:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Get ready for the tomato-mobile.

Ford and Heinz are looking at ways to make car parts out of ketchup by-products, the automaker announced Tuesday.

Heinz uses more than two million tons of tomatoes every year and produces a lot of waste from the peels, stems and seeds.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Sustainability • Technology • Waste


Pinterest
| Part of
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,309 other followers