'Clean eating' defined
January 23rd, 2014
03:15 PM ET
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Editor's note: Cynthia Sass is a registered dietitian with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health, and the author of "S.A.S.S! Yourself Slim: Conquer Cravings, Drop Pounds and Lose Inches." Connect with Cynthia on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

The first time I heard the word "clean" in relation to food was way back in the mid-1990s. I attended a conference about supermarket trends, and learned that grocery chains were starting to "clean up" store brand ingredient lists by removing unrecognizable terms.

Back then, this move was considered controversial, because it involved doing away with added nutrients, listed by their technical, non-household names (like pantothenic acid, a B vitamin), as well as eliminating preservatives, which meant short shelf lives (e.g., would consumers really want bread that gets hard or moldy within a few days?).

But, the writing was on the wall. Consumers were starting to pay attention to how foods were made, and what they were made of, health food stores were attracting more and more customers, and Wild Oats Markets (a chain of natural food stores and farmer's markets, later acquired by Whole Foods) experienced a remarkable 4-year growth of 544% between 1989 and 1993, making it one of the fastest growing small companies in America.

Today, two decades down the road, clean eating, or eating clean, is a major movement, spurred by people from all walks of life who want to feel good about what they're putting in their bodies.

Read - What is clean eating?



soundoff (One Response)
  1. Arturo Féliz-Camilo

    Reblogged this on Mr. Feliz's Blog (Teacher Arturo).

    January 24, 2014 at 4:09 pm |

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