January 13th, 2014
08:15 AM ET
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Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

Thank you, University of Adelaide. It turns out that a researcher there, Professor Kym Anderson, has been engaged in a lengthy project analyzing the world’s grape-growing regions and has determined - among many, many other things - that Cabernet Sauvignon is the most widely planted wine grape in the world.
 
Of course, there are variations by region; in Kazakhstan, for instance, Rkatsiteli is the most widely planted variety. In Thailand, somewhat mysteriously, it’s Syrah. But overall, Cabernet wins. Be glad. Twenty years ago the world’s most planted grape variety was a Spanish white grape called Airén, notable primarily for being incredibly bland.
 
And so, seeing as how there’s so much darn Cabernet in the world, a little advice about which ones to buy seems in order. Here are a few top bargains. (And, if you truly want to indulge your inner wine geek, Anderson’s wine-grape study is available for free as a PDF e-book.)
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Filed under: Content Partner • Food and Wine • Sip • Wine


January 13th, 2014
08:00 AM ET
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In Egypt, the words "street food" and "gourmet" don't often go hand in hand.

Street food is not about style; it's meant to be quick, cheap and filling. However Chris Khalifa, a 30-year-old owner of Zooba cafe in Cairo, has tried to change that.

He saw a trend elsewhere in the world: chefs hit the streets and serve dishes out of food trucks.

"I noticed no one had ever tried to do this with Egyptian street food," said Khalifa. "I try to create a brand around a more gourmet Egyptian street food."
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Filed under: African • Cuisines • Egyptian


January 13th, 2014
06:00 AM ET
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Tyson Foods has announced a recall of nearly 34,000 pounds of chicken on fears of salmonella contamination.

The United State Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service was notified of a Salmonella Heidelberg cluster of illnesses on December 12, 2013. Together with the Tennessee Department of Health, the FSIS discovered a link between mechanically separated chicken products from Tyson Foods, and an outbreak of illness in a Tennessee correctional facility. Seven people were sickened, and of those cases, two were hospitalized.
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Coffee klatsch
January 13th, 2014
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


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