July 15th, 2013
12:10 AM ET
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Editor's note: Darrin Nordahl is the author of "Public Produce: The New Urban Agriculture." Aiming to increase food literacy in America, Darrin also pens the daily food blog Today is...Fava Beans! Follow him on Twitter.

What's better than fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables? How about fresh, locally-grown, free fruits and vegetables, all within an easy walk of your home or office?

Such is the philosophy behind the growing movement of public produce.

Perhaps you've heard of guerrilla gardening, whereby rogue citizens trespass onto neglected property to cultivate pansies and potatoes, roses and rhubarb, in an illicit attempt to better their community.

Or maybe you've witnessed a couple of plum and pear trees filled with ripe fruit, wedged in that public zone between the sidewalk and the curb. Or a lone apple tree in the corner of your neighborhood park. These fruit trees were likely planted by citizens in an effort to bring fresh, free produce to their community brethren.

In cities throughout the world, citizens are facing rising costs for fresh produce and declining health from the Western diet, characterized by energy dense, nutrient poor fast foods. It is now cheaper to gorge oneself on Big Macs and Whoppers than it is zucchini and tomatoes.

Read - Solving obesity crisis: Strawberries in parking lots

Previously:
Young minds bloom on an urban farm
Random acts of farming and hope
A mission of hope in an urban garden



soundoff (48 Responses)
  1. Coach fitness

    Jdizzle you are correct! I would have a list of the best gardens in the neighborhood. This place would be a gold mine.
    How are they securing it?

    January 29, 2014 at 5:03 pm | Reply
  2. Jdizzle McHammerpants ♫♫

    I've always said if I were ever homeless I'd tail it to some place where I could raid gardens all the time. No need for dumpster diving.

    July 15, 2013 at 2:52 pm | Reply
  3. 01dd0g

    Well said, so often the "nature strip" along side houses is just some rough grass and weeds. This is an underutilized asset for food growing. I think you will find http://68anda6pack.com/2013/07/12/forking-good-exercise/ very relevant to your cause.

    July 15, 2013 at 4:33 am | Reply
    • Chris Acebu

      Wow! Nice post man! Thanks.

      July 19, 2013 at 1:06 am | Reply
  4. ilovemyuniverse13

    Reblogged this on ilovemyuniverse13 and commented:
    wonderful

    July 15, 2013 at 2:53 am | Reply

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