October 15th, 2012
06:00 PM ET
Share this on:

What drink pairs best with an entrée of fake bloody brains? “Brain Belt Cranium” beer. Duh.

The beer was a limited edition replacement for “Grain Belt Premium,” created by August Schell Brewing Company, specifically for a night when the living dead come out to feast on flesh and, more importantly, to drink.

It’s the eighth annual Twin Cities Zombie Pub Crawl. What started as a gathering of 80-100 zombie-philes in 2005 has grown to an event that brings in about 30,000 people.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Bars • Sip • Weird News


5@5 - Odd ingredients for the experimental home cook
October 15th, 2012
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

While octopus, squid ink, razor clams, sea urchin and goat might sound a little terrifying to the home cook of the boneless-skinless-chicken-breast-variety, they're eaten quite regularly around the world and easy to prepare with a little ingenuity.

Seeing that Halloween is just a few weeks away, Mike Isabella, "Top Chef" alum and author of the newly released "Mike Isabella's Crazy Good Italian: Big Flavors, Small Plates," dares you to cook up something delicious.

Five ingredients that aren't as scary to cook with as you might think: Mike Isabella
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Make • Recipes • Think


The barbecuing pirates of Tortuga
October 15th, 2012
03:15 PM ET
Share this on:

Editor's note: The Southern Foodways Alliance delves deep in the history, tradition, heroes and plain old deliciousness of barbecue across the United States. Dig in.

Did pirates barbecue? Arrrrgh, of course they did, though the barbecuing may actually have come before the buccaneering.

Around 1630, the small island of Tortuga off the northwestern coast of Hispaniola (today, the Dominican Republic and Haiti) became a haven for a motley lot of vagabonds and refugees - deserters, escaped slaves, and shipwrecked sailors of all nationalities. They would sneak over to Hispaniola to hunt the wild cattle and pigs that roamed the sparsely populated coast, taking whatever they bagged back to Tortuga to avoid the local authorities.

These hunters discovered they could sell dried meat, hides, and lard to planters and ship captains, and soon they became known as “boucaniers.” The term derived from the Tupi word boucan, meaning a grate on which meat was slowly cured over a small fire. The hunters of Tortuga used such grates to dry their meat for sale and to cook feasts for themselves.
FULL POST



October 15th, 2012
11:00 AM ET
Share this on:

Oprah's former personal chef Art Smith talks weight loss in the food biz, fried chicken and the importance of having the family involved in the kitchen.

Posted by:
Filed under: Art Smith • Celebrity Chefs • News • Think • Video


Buy a bottle, save a breast
October 15th, 2012
10:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Ray Isle (@islewine on Twitter) is Food & Wine's executive wine editor. We trust his every cork pop and decant – and the man can sniff out a bargain to boot. Take it away, Ray.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Though that's not normally a wine-related subject, in fact several wineries have made commitments to help fight breast cancer. Some donate profits to help fund mammograms, some help support medical center, and some contribute to breast cancer research - no matter which route they've chosen, it's a good road to take.

Here are four that are doing their share:
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Charity • Content Partner • Food and Wine • Health News • Sip • Wine


Recent comments
Pinterest
Archive
October 2012
M T W T F S S
« Sep   Nov »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
| Part of