National pierogi day
October 8th, 2012
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

Pierogies are Eastern Europe’s equivalent of ravioli or tortellini - essentially filled dumplings. This peasant dish originated in Poland in the 13th century, and hasn’t changed much since.

Let’s start with the name, just to clear things up. You’ll probably see it spelled pierogi, pirohgi, pierogie or any combination thereof. Merriam-Webster spells it pierogi, which is also the internationally accepted standard spelling. Pierogi is actually the plural of pierog, so saying pierogies is a little redundant but socially accepted.

Now for the dough. Back in the day, the dough was made simply with flour and water. These days, some dough recipes use eggs, and sometimes even sour cream. The dough is rolled out and cut into circles. The circles are filled and then sealed and boiled. After boiling, they may be pan sautéed or fried for some texture and color.

As for the filling, traditional pierogies feature mashed potato, cheese, sauerkraut, fried onions, meat or mushrooms, but the sky’s the limit on this. There are also different fillings to celebrate different holidays and times of year. If you’re making pierogies at home, make sure they're sealed well so you don’t lose the filling during the cooking process.

Typically pierogies are served hot, often with a sour cream dipping sauce, fried onions and applesauce. Dessert pierogies may be filled with fruit, chocolate or sweet cheese.

Want to try your hand at a batch at home? Look no further than pierogi enthusiast Martha Stewart who claims them as her favorite food.

Got a favorite filling? Share in the comments below. We're partial to potato and cheese or possibly sauerkraut.

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Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News


soundoff (14 Responses)
  1. Andy

    Vereneky!

    October 8, 2013 at 3:43 pm |
  2. chris

    That sounds like something that would be good for dinner.

    October 14, 2012 at 3:45 pm |
  3. Bert C

    my family loves them filled with cottage cheese that sauteed onions have been added also saurkraut filled ones are eccellent

    October 12, 2012 at 3:28 pm |
  4. Bert C

    my family loves them filled with cottage cheese that has sauteed onions mixed in. The saukraut ones are excellent to.

    October 12, 2012 at 3:27 pm |
  5. Amy w/a W

    Just spent last Saturday at my big sis's house with loved ones making pierogi from my grandmother's cherished plain recipe, 341 of them to be exact. Then they're served with lots of fried onions in butter and a classic american cheese sauce. Hard work but well worth it!!

    October 10, 2012 at 1:13 pm |
  6. VladT

    My sister was never a big breakfast person ( she hates eggs, bacon, etc ), but on big breakfast days growing up, I remember my dad making me an omelette and then heating her up frozen perogies from Trader Joes. He would heat them up, then cover them with parmesan cheese and garlic, then heat them up more.
    I preferred the omelette, but they sure smelled good, and my sister sure devoured them

    October 9, 2012 at 8:01 am |
  7. c collier

    Back in Akron, when we heard my gramma Musleve was making pierogi, everyone in the family rushed over to be the first there to eat them up .... yum yum!

    October 8, 2012 at 9:46 pm |
  8. jillmarie

    Yumm-o! I just went to a Hungarian festival this weekend and bought a dozen of their equivilent that were frozen- maybe that will be dinner tonight. Pierogies have always been a favorite of mine- love learning the history.

    October 8, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
  9. Northside Jill

    How exciting! I'm a true Pittsburgh Hunky so I grew up eating these with cabbage, potatoes, and (ugh!) even prunes. A quick internet search will turn up some great blogs about making pierogies, halusky, city chicken, red beets & eggs, and other Pittsburgh favorites.

    October 8, 2012 at 1:57 pm |
    • Kat Kinsman

      Haluski! http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2012/02/29/sowing-seeds-of-comfort-with-slovak-soul-food/

      October 8, 2012 at 6:48 pm |
  10. rachew Williamski

    You have not lived untill u have HAD a NEW ENGLAND LOBSTAAA PIEROGI .. MMMMMMMMM

    October 8, 2012 at 12:20 pm |
    • Northside Jill

      Wow, way to fancy up some peasant food! I'm definitely going to check these out. Thanks for the tip!

      October 8, 2012 at 1:58 pm |
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