Quest for the perfect power lunch
September 14th, 2012
11:30 AM ET
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If a way to a man's heart is through his stomach, then what's true in love is true in business too. At least, it is in New York City.

With some of the most upscale eateries and trendy downtown diners in the world, where you decide to take a client for lunch can be just as vital as what you talk about between bites in the Big Apple.

Indeed, it's widely believed the term "power lunch" itself was first coined in a 1979 article by Lee Eisenberg, the then-editor-in-chief of Esquire Magazine, while writing about a new lunch scene that had popped-up in midtown Manhattan.

And while the food may have changed, it seems as many deals are brokered over the buffet counter as ever before. Although individuals are generally spending less on eating out, corporate spending is currently the largest driver of growth at fine dining and casual restaurants across New York, according to American Express.

Tim Zagat is the co-founder and CEO of the influential Zagat restaurant survey. He says that even during the peak of the financial crisis, lavish power lunches - involving food bills as outlandish as the transactions on the table - were still commonplace.

"I could tell you 30 or 40 restaurants in New York off the top of my head, where you would find a full house, and nobody is spending less than $100 for lunch," he said.

Suffice it to say; the man knows a thing or two about the refined art of power lunching. So from big-spenders to penny-pinchers, here Zagat picks a spot to suit every budget.

See Zagat's picks for the ultimate New York power lunch

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Filed under: Classic • Culture • Fine Dining • Restaurants • Richard Quest


soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. Van

    Great clip, very interesting.

    September 14, 2012 at 8:20 pm | Reply
  2. TX4UREXKARLENE

    I Love how N.Y. Could not look this Awesome without Mother Nature ;]

    September 14, 2012 at 11:46 am | Reply

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