Opinion: Jane Velez-Mitchell – Slaughterhouse video shows USDA needs to clean up its act
August 23rd, 2012
02:00 PM ET
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Jane Velez-Mitchell is the author of 'iWant: My Journey from Addiction and Overconsumption to a Simpler, Honest Life' and 'Secrets Can Be Murder: The Killer Next Door' as well as 'Addict Nation: An Intervention for America'. She hosts the Jane Velez-Mitchell show nightly on HLN at 7p ET.

It’s happened again: what I clearly see as cruelty to cows caught on tape. This time at a supplier to fast food giant In-N-Out Burger, which immediately cut ties to the slaughterhouse.

It’s just the latest investigation into America’s meat industry to uncover horrific cruelty inflicted upon helpless farm animals. After getting a job at the slaughterhouse, an undercover investigator from the animal welfare group Compassion Over Killing spent two weeks using a hidden camera to document how workers treated the cows there.

The videotape contains images so vile that many news organizations feel they can only show brief snippets. After all, who wants to witness a dairy cow enduring a slow and agonizing death, thrashing about and bleeding after being shot over and over again with a pneumatic gun that can’t seem to render her unconscious? Who wants to see an apparently still conscious cow being lifted up by one leg via a conveyor as she writhes in agony?
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Lunchbox collection jam-packed with memories
August 23rd, 2012
10:00 AM ET
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Do you remember your favorite school lunchbox? It may have featured an image of your favorite cartoon character, band, movie or TV show. (Mine was a 1978 "Muppet Show" lunchbox with a Kermit the Frog thermos inside it.)

The lunchbox has been a key accessory for American schoolkids for more than 60 years, according to Peter Liebhold, a curator with the National Museum of American History. It's an American status symbol, too. "Today, if you travel to Target, Walmart or other back-to-school retailers, you will see kids and parents constructing their identity through lunchboxes (as well as clothes, backpacks and binders)," Liebhold noted in an e-mail.

The lunchbox as we know it can be traced back to 1935 when Geuder, Paeschke & Frey produced the first licensed character lunchbox with Mickey Mouse on it. But it wasn't until after World War II when the lunchbox entered its prime.

Read the full story: America's fascination with the school lunchbox

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Filed under: Culture • Nostalgia • Think


Coffee klatsch
August 23rd, 2012
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


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