Got a spare $168,000? Thirsty? Have we got the wine for you!
June 28th, 2012
09:15 AM ET
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It's a little-known fact, but wealthy people are actually physically unable to ingest liquids that cost less than $20 per fluid ounce. Consequently, today is a banner day for 12 lucky, loaded imbibers around the globe.

Not only will they have the privilege of spending an estimated $168,000 for one of the dozen "Ampoules" of 2004 Block 42 wine newly available from Australian winemaker Penfolds, but as part of the purchase price, a senior official from said company will be personally dispatched to them to ceremoniously remove the precious liquid from its glass plumb-bob casing and open it "using a specially designed, tungsten-tipped, sterling silver scribe-snap." This same human will then "prepare the wine using a beautifully crafted sterling silver tastevin." How fancy is that?
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Filed under: Expensive • Sip • Wine


National ceviche day
June 28th, 2012
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

When life gives you lemons, make ceviche - June 28 is el Día Nacional del Cebiche, or National Ceviche Day!

Ceviche is a South and Central American dish that has swum into the mainstream in recent years. It’s made by marinating a firm fish in citric acid, typically from a lemon or lime. The acid essentially "cooks" the fish over time by chemical process.
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Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News • Peru


Coffee klatsch
June 28th, 2012
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


The breakdown: a third of all food products worldwide go uneaten
June 27th, 2012
07:00 PM ET
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At first glance, Austrian artist Klaus Pichler's spell-binding photographs could be mistaken for a set of stylish advertisements. It takes a moment to digest - excuse the pun - that you're staring at pictures of rotting food.

Among them, a pineapple hangs suspended in negative space above an antique gold dish - its formerly yellow flesh having given way to luminous green mold; Deep purple beetroots sit snugly in an elegant porcelain vase with thin films of gray fur accumulating on their skin.
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Filed under: Environment • Hunger


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