Horse: Coming soon to a meat case near you?
November 30th, 2011
03:00 PM ET
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When President Barack Obama signed the spending bill into law on November 18, another piece of the legislation trotted in under the radar.

The Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2012, better known as the spending bill or H.R. 2112, allocated funding for several federal departments and agencies - including the U.S. Department of Agriculture - until September 2012.

And part of that bill lifted a 5-year-old ban on the slaughter of horses for meat.

In 2006, Congress "prohibited the use of federal funds to inspect horses destined for food, effectively prohibiting domestic slaughter" according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO).

Currently, there are no horse slaughterhouses in the U.S. If that were to change, the USDA assured it would conduct the appropriate inspections to ensure humane methods of handling the animals and humane slaughter in a statement.
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Filed under: Animal Rights • Food Politics • Horse • News • PETA • Taboos


Malawian bakers invoke Osama bin Laden to sell buns
November 30th, 2011
01:00 PM ET
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Naming a product after the world's most notorious terrorist may not seem like a surefire route to commercial success.

For bakers in the Malawian city of Blantyre, however, this marketing ploy is helping to reel in customers while ensuring that their produce has an unmistakeable identity.

"We make bin Laden buns," said Mahomed Hanif Valimamade, co-owner of a patisserie within the city named the Portuguese Bakery.

The standard bread rolls - which are not exclusive to any one company and are produced by a variety of outlets in Blantyre - were initially given their unconventional moniker by customers who likened their appearance to similar bread made in the Middle East, says Valimamade.

Read - Bin Laden bread a hit for Malawi bakers

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Filed under: Taboos • Weird News


Box lunch: Dating dividends and pig wings
November 30th, 2011
12:00 PM ET
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Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • Now, I ain't saying she's a gold digger: A young woman scored more than $1,200 a month in Champagne wishes and caviar dreams from potential suitors on Match.com. - Business Insider



  • Flavor firms are trying to double your taste buds' pleasure without doubling the cost. - Food Navigator


  • Pigs still can't fly, but they do have wings - and they're quite the ham-tastic treat. - New York Times


  • Just us, or does the two-dollar six-inch not have the same ring to it as the five-dollar footlong? - USA Today
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Filed under: Box Lunch • News


Japan Eats: iReport – How do you ramen?
November 30th, 2011
11:00 AM ET
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For some folks, they're a quick, cheap hunger fix. For others, they're something of an obsession - and even an art form.

Ramen noodles have been winning over the hearts and stomachs of people around the world since their invention in 1958. In Japan, the instant noodles and their many variations are more than just a staple meal - they are a way of life. There are even museums dedicated to the low-cost, instant dish.

iReport wants to know - how do you like your ramen at a restaurant? How do you prepare it at at home? What special ingredients do you use or order, or do you just stick to the brick and packet?

Using iReport, send us pictures of your creative ramen masterpieces by December 31st and we'll feature our favorites in an upcoming feature on Eatocracy.

iReport: How do you ramen?
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Filed under: Asian • Buzz • Cuisines • Feature • iReport • Japan • Japan Eats • Japanese


Breakfast buffet: National mousse day
November 30th, 2011
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday.

Not to be confused with National Moose Day, November 30 is National Mousse Day!

If it's a bit gray, cold and damp outside of your window today, nothing says pick-me-up like diving into a bowl of rich, creamy mousse. Like pudding, this French dessert can roll all your cares away and replace it with a big fat smile.

However, unlike pudding, the secret to great mousse is incorporating air bubbles to give it a light texture. Depending on the amount of air that gets whipped in, it can be thick and creamy or downright fluffy. The base begins with eggs, cream, sugar and whatever way you want to flavor it.
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November 30th, 2011
08:00 AM ET
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We get food crushes sometimes. It might be a chef whose stracciatella makes our hearts sing (that'd be you, Missy Robbins), a winemaker with a barrel-sized brain and wit to match (cheers, Randall Graham), or a writer out of whom we'd just like to hug the stuffing (we're coming for you, Francis Lam).

This time it's Amy Evans Streeter, who we'd always known as the oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance. In this capacity, she oversees the organization's efforts to record and archive interviews with Southerners who grow, create, serve, and consume food and drink, so their words and wisdom are preserved for future generations.

That would be reason enough to adore her, but as it happens, she's also an exceptionally gifted painter who, naturally, uses food as the nexus of many of her visual narratives. Her work documents small, intimate histories of characters who we'll never actually meet, but we certainly know the likes of.
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Filed under: Bite • Cuisines • Cultural Identity • Culture • Food Crushes • Southern • Think • Visual Art


Coffee klatsch
November 30th, 2011
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.

Consider the daily Coffee Klatsch post as your VIP lounge – the primary comments thread for readers who'd like to chat about topics not related to the articles we're running. That way, everyone knows where to find each other, and each post's comments section remains on topic.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


November 29th, 2011
02:00 PM ET
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Arugula, radishes, kale, pomegranates, persimmons, figs and quince – these are just some of the varieties of produce tended by students at Burgess-Peterson Elementary school, an urban school on the east side of Atlanta.

When the garden started three years ago, students hadn't even heard of – much less grown and eaten – a lot of the food now grown on school grounds.

And yet on the day CNN visited the school, fifth-graders ate quiche made with fresh spinach from the school garden, and fourth-graders chomped happily on slices of persimmon, an unusual orange-colored fruit, harvested from the school's fruit orchard.

You'd be surprised, said fifth-grade teacher Megan Kiser, what foods students are willing to try if they grow it themselves.
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Filed under: Food Politics • Gardening • Local Food • News • School Lunch • Urban Gardening


Box lunch: Yeast extract gridlock and a minibar.ber.shop
November 29th, 2011
12:00 PM ET
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Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • Marmite spill ends up causing a jam on a British carriageway. (We're here to spread the humor all week.) - BBC News


  • Hey Tang! Where'd you go? - Fortune


  • Waiters! They're just like you! Swearsies. - CBS News


  • "Gym, tan, laundry" meet "shop, eat, haircut." - NRN


  • If the likes of Virginia Woolf and Geoffrey Chaucer took a stab at food writing. - Independent
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Filed under: Box Lunch • News


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