No yolk! The best scrambled eggs
May 13th, 2011
08:00 PM ET
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My grand entrance into the culinary world was a sham.

Scrambled eggs were the first thing I ever cooked by myself as a child, my mother standing over me assuring the dish was simple, quick and hard to mess up. She was right - I certainly didn't mess them up, but the scrambled eggs I made were the rubber tires on the Rolls Royce of œufs to come.

Allow me to let you in on a little secret. The best scrambled eggs take up to half an hour to make, the slower the better and they're really good with cream and butter.
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Filed under: Cooking • Eggs • Make • Recipes • Staples


Notes from Zone 6b - eat shoots and leaves
May 13th, 2011
07:30 PM ET
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Eatocracy's Managing Editor Kat Kinsman attempts to vegetable garden on a roof deck in Brooklyn, NY in USDA Hardiness Zone 6b. Feel free to taunt, advise or encourage her efforts as this series progresses.

I'm slightly miffed with everyone who ever neglected to tell me that not only are radish greens totally edible - they rival schmancy, pricey salad standards like arugula, escarole and mache for crunch and distinctive flavor. All you've got to do is wash and chop them, and if you have radish greens around, there's a goodly chance you have radishes as well. Oil, dash of vinegar, dusting of pecorino - boop! Salad.
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Today's random bit of ex-presidential food news
May 13th, 2011
05:15 PM ET
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From today's CNN Political Ticker "Bush breaks silence on bin Laden"

"Bush said he was eating soufflé with Laura Bush and two friends when he got the call from the president. He then excused himself and returned home to take Obama's call."



5@5 - Pete Evans
May 13th, 2011
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

In the summertime when the weather is fine, we've got fishing weekends away, al fresco boozy brunches and barbecues on our minds - sorry Mungo Jerry.

It's the season to pack the whole Griswold clan into the station wagon, get away and add a little fuel to the fire.

And it seems Pete Evans, Australian chef, restaurateur and author of "My Grill: Outdoor Cooking Australian Style," is just as fired up about the art of outdoor cooking as we are.

There's nothing like - and as delicious as - the great outdoors.

Five Ways to Bring Typically Indoor Meals to the Great Outdoors: Pete Evans
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Filed under: 5@5 • Grilling • Make • Think


Flooding 'could be devastating' for Gulf oystermen
May 13th, 2011
12:45 PM ET
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As the massive flooding from the Mississippi heads towards the nation's richest oyster grounds, Mike Voisin feels that old familiar feeling.

He's seen the damage caused to the oyster business in Louisiana firsthand over the past six years. After Hurricane Rita and then Hurricane Katrina ravaged Louisiana, the oyster business realized they needed protection.  A part-government, part-private insurance program gave them breathing room to recuperate.

But then the blows kept coming. One, after another, after another. Hurricane Ike and Hurricane Gustav again battered the spirits and livelihoods of those who depend on their oyster crops.

Read "Oysterman: BP left us vulnerable, flooding could be 'knockout blow'"

Previously - Oysters stage a comeback after BP disaster

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Filed under: Disaster • Environment • Flood • News • Oil Spill


Box lunch
May 13th, 2011
12:00 PM ET
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Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • A few tips on how to behave in a bar. - NY Post





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Filed under: Box Lunch • News


Breakfast Buffet
May 13th, 2011
09:00 AM ET
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It doesn't get more American than this - May 13 is National Apple Pie Day.

As the old jingle goes, "baseball, hotdogs, apple pie and Chevrolet," we're proud of a lot of things here in the 50 states, but apple pie is a treat with a worldly past.  In fact, it's been gracing English, Dutch and Swedish tables since before our birth in 1776.

The original English apple pie recipe - "good apples, good spices, figs, raisins and pears" - didn't include sugar because sugar cane wasn't widely available during the days of Chaucer, circa 1381.  Dutch apple pie introduced lemon juice and cinnamon to the recipe, while the Swedish version has no crust but a pastry poured over the apples instead.

Once apple trees crossed the Atlantic to take root in the colonies, Americans began experimenting with what would become their trademark dessert from the 18th century onward.  Leave it to us to add sugar and dump a scoop of ice cream on top.
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May 13th, 2011
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.

Consider the daily Coffee Klatsch post as your VIP lounge – the primary comments thread for readers who'd like to chat about topics not related to the articles we're running. That way, everyone knows where to find each other, and each post's comments section remains on topic.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


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