Drink to your youth
March 23rd, 2011
05:50 PM ET
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Wine doesn’t always get better with age – especially not to a new wave of vino pros slinging bottles of Château Margaux older than they are.

“Wine is bigger than ever. It’s more of a part of our younger generation’s lifestyle,” said Justin Amick, 29, sommelier - or wine steward - at Parish restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia. “Food culture is just so popular right now – and wine definitely goes along with the foodie culture.”

According to a recent Nielsen survey, the majority of millennials (age 21-34) are purchasing relatively more wine (and spirits for that matter) than older generations did at that age.

“I turned 21 on January 31, and I took the introductory [sommelier] course the first week of March,” said Desi Echaverrie, 29, who runs the wine program at Julian Serrano in Las Vegas, Nevada. “So basically a month had passed, and that’s because it was the soonest I could take it.”

Echavarrie is currently an Advanced Sommelier and a Masters Sommelier Candidate – he had previously won the 2004 Young Sommelier Competition at the ripe age of 22.
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Filed under: Sip • Wine


5@5 - Stephanie Izard
March 23rd, 2011
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Attention grocery store shoppers: it's that time of year again when rows of matzo-based products start dominating supermarket displays as the Jewish eight-day holiday of Passover draws near.

During Passover, which begins the night of April 18 this year, Jewish people all over the world will forgo leavened bread products to commemorate the story of the Exodus.

Sure - some people only eat the unleavened cracker during Passover out of observance, but chef Stephanie Izard likes her matzo all year 'round.

Stephanie Izard was the season four winner of Bravo's über popular reality cooking competition, "Top Chef." Her latest venture, Girl and the Goat, just nabbed a 2011 James Beard Award nomination for "Best Restaurant."

Matzo has been one of my favorite snacks since I was a kid.  Many of my friends that are Jewish and had matzo during Passover thought I was nuts for eating it year round.  It is a giant cracker - what is not to like?  So here are some of my go-to simple toppers for this giant crunchy and delicious any time snack.

Five Favorite Matzo Toppers: Stephanie Izard
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Filed under: 5@5 • Holidays • Passover • Stephanie Izard • Think


March 23rd, 2011
01:15 PM ET
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Sanjay Gupta, "Even if you were to eat this radioactive spinach every day, the amount of radiation you'd get over a year of doing this would be about equivalent to one CT scan."

More on food and radiation



Box lunch
March 23rd, 2011
12:00 PM ET
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Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.


  • A private company is funding a national nutrition study of children in Southeast Asia. The catch is the company specializes in dairy products, leading some to believe the study will inevitably show that kids need to drink more milk. - Food Politics



  • New U.S. legislation could murk up domestic catfish production. - NPR


  • As opposed to the usual doom and gloom, Mark Bittman lists six things consumers can actually feel good about in the the current state of food. - New York Times



  • Speaking of vegetarians: one non-meat eater was so unhappy with her in-flight meal, she decided the proper course of action was to throw it at the flight attendant. #winning - New York Post
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Filed under: Box Lunch • News


Elizabeth Taylor – movie star, chili lover
March 23rd, 2011
11:00 AM ET
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Recently departed movie legend Elizabeth Taylor was a woman of many obvious passions - glamorous companionship, AIDS activism, wedding receptions. Perhaps most undersung of them? Chili.
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Filed under: Celebrities • Chili • Dishes • News


March 23rd, 2011
09:00 AM ET
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While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday and the most delicious finds on TV.

Dip-a-dee-doo-dah, dip-a-dee-ay
My, oh my what a wonderful day!
Plenty of salsa heading our way
Dip-a-dee-doo-dah, dip-a-dee-ay!

March 23 is National Chip and Dip Day.

So - how YOU dippin'? Chip in.

What's on TV?
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Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News


Coffee klatsch
March 23rd, 2011
05:00 AM ET
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Pssst! Got a sec to chat?

We are utterly thrilled when readers want to hang out and talk – whether it's amongst themselves or in response to pieces we've posted. We want Eatocracy to be a cozy, spirited online home for those who find their way here.

Consider the daily Coffee klatsch post as your VIP lounge – the primary comments thread for readers who'd like to chat about topics not related to the articles we're running. That way, everyone knows where to find each other, and each post's comments section remains on topic.
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Filed under: Buzz • Coffee Klatsch


March 23rd, 2011
01:45 AM ET
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Japan's Health Ministry reported Tuesday finding radioactive materials at levels "drastically exceeding legal limits" in 11 types of vegetables grown in Fukushima Prefecture, including broccoli and cabbage, according to Kyodo News Agency.

None of the vegetables have been shipped since Monday, it said.

The news agency, citing the ministry, said, "If a person eats 100 grams (3 1/2 ounces) of the vegetable with the largest detected amount of radioactive materials for about 10 days, it would be equal to ingesting half the amount of radiation a person typically receives from the natural environment in a year."

"If a person keeps eating the vegetable at the same pace, the amount of radiation intake could exceed the amount deemed safe."

Read Vegetables near stricken plant test high for radiation

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Filed under: Disaster • Environment • Health News • Japan • Radiation • Tainted Food


iReport – The Fabulous Beekman Boys: What has growing your own food taught you about life?
March 23rd, 2011
01:30 AM ET
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When Josh Kilmer-Purcell and his longtime partner Dr. Brent Ridge stumbled across a 19-century mansion for sale in the tiny, upstate New York village of Sharon Springs during an apple picking trip, little did they know they'd lay down roots.

Josh, a New York Times bestselling author, ad executive and former drag queen and Brent, a former VP of Healthy Living for Martha Stewart, spent the next several years transforming the Beekman Mansion's mostly abandoned barn and surrounding acres into the sustainable, working farm that now fuels their burgeoning goat soap and cheese brands at Beekman 1802. It also serves as the core of their reality show, The Fabulous Beekman Boys and Josh's memoir 'The Bucolic Plague'.

As the pair connected with the land, establishing their heirloom vegetable garden and learning to grow nearly everything they ate, they realized they had also planted the seeds of self-discovery.
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