Hey Terroir, what'cha drinking for Thanksgiving? (Hint – not Beaujolais Nouveau)
November 18th, 2010
08:45 PM ET
Share this on:

If someone built a wine bar in my heart, it'd be Terroir. In their two Manhattan locations, as well as at their sister restaurant Hearth (home of Next Iron Chef contender Marco Canora), general manager, sommelier and proud son of Canada Paul Grieco and his merry band of oenophiles enact a sort of grape-based activism, bringing under-drunk, often challenging wines to the fore.

As the Hearth website notes, "The list is meant to be confrontational as the majority of wines are not well known. But have no fear, we are here to guide you and educate you – without the intimidation factor."

Amen to that. Some of the most exquisite and unpretentious melding of food and booze I've ever had has been at the hands of Grieco and Co. - including, 4 1/2 years ago, a Sherry-centric dinner that paired courses with many permutations of the fortified Spanish wine. That dinner has flitted across my mind lately, so I reached out to the team via e-mail.

So, I have this wacky notion that people should serve Sherry at Thanksgiving (sorry, Paul – American Thanksgiving). Agree? Think that’s just poppycock? Are there any grapes from the back of the bus that could use some love on T-Day?

FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Holidays • HolidayShopping • Sip • Thanksgiving • Wine


November 18th, 2010
05:05 PM ET
Share this on:

Recipes continued from: Bon Appétit editor-in-chief Barbara Fairchild's favorite desserts.

Pumpkin Cheesecake with Marshmallow–Sour Cream Topping and Gingersnap Crust
Makes 12 servings

Crust
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2 cups gingersnap cookie crumbs
1 cup pecans
1⁄4 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
2 tablespoons chopped crystallized ginger
1⁄4 cup (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Recipes • Think


5@5 - Bon Appétit editor-in-chief Barbara Fairchild
November 18th, 2010
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Barbara Fairchild joined the team at Bon Appétit magazine in 1978 - and 22 years later, in 2000, she became the magazine's editor-in-chief. Now, after 32 years at Bon Appétit - serving the last ten at the helm - Barbara Fairchild is moving on.

That's not to say that more than three decades at a food magazine doesn't create some sweet memories along the way. She chronicles such in her new cookbook Bon Appétit Desserts: The Cookbook for All Things Sweet and Wonderful.

Join her on a sweet trip down memory lane, won't you?

My Five Favorite Dessert Memories During My 32 Years at Bon Appétit: Barbara Fairchild
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Magazines • Think


Lunchtime poll – holiday hullabaloo
November 18th, 2010
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

If popular culture is to be believed, there is no such thing as a Thanksgiving meal uninterrupted by drama. It might be a tipsy and belligerent uncle, a cook's meltdown when the entire table skips her gluey mashed potatoes, or a cousin who decides that the lull between the clearing of the turkey carcass and the presentation of the pumpkin pie is the ideal time to announce that his roommate isn't, uh, just his roommate. TV and movies are rife with over-the-top T-Day debacles, but is that the case in real life?

Most of mine have gone smoothly, so the few incidents that occurred have burned onto my brain like marshmallows on the edge of a sweet potato casserole pan. A guest power-chugged cheap Champagne in the last 15 minutes of her stay, smashing a bottle on the street when we tried to hail a cab for her. A relative who will remain nameless phoned her parents, stone cold sober, and berated them for not making her feel loved enough as a kid. My Grandmother deemed me a "slut" for having at one time had a platonic male roommate.

I celebrate Thanksgiving with several friends now.
FULL POST



Box lunch
November 18th, 2010
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • The most indulgent pies on the Thanksgiving spread. - Daily Beast


  • Le Beaujolais Nouveau, the celebrated wine released once a year on the third Thursday of November, est arrivé! - DI-VE


  • Single-use plastic bags have been banned in stores in some parts of Los Angeles County. - Huffington Post


  • The world's most suggestive turkey timer. - Gizmodo


Posted by:
Filed under: Box Lunch • News


French gastronomy added to U.N. 'intangible heritages' list
November 18th, 2010
11:00 AM ET
Share this on:

A United Nations committee added Spanish flamenco and French gastronomy to a list of "intangible heritages" that need preservation, a spokeswoman for the world body said Wednesday.

The additions were among 51 items added to a list that highlights elements needing protection amid globalization and urbanization.

The items were from 29 countries, the U.N. agency said.

"The gastronomic meal of the French is a customary social practice for celebrating important moments," the agency said in a statement.

This is the first time cuisine has made the list.

Read: U.N. adds French food and flamenco to heritage list

Posted by:
Filed under: News • Travel


November 18th, 2010
10:45 AM ET
Share this on:

By the way – don't eat the fake leaf. It's not actually edible.

More coverage from i-List Japan

Posted by:
Filed under: Asia • Asian • Bite • Cuisines • Japanese • Travel • Video


For the record: how to eat an artichoke
November 18th, 2010
09:45 AM ET
Share this on:

Miami doctor Arturo Carvajal is suing the Houston's Restaurant chain for allowing him to eat an entire grilled artichoke, not warning him that parts of the vegetable aren't safely digestible or offering any instruction as to how to consume it.

According to the suit filed on October 25th, Mr. Carvajal began "experiencing severe abdominal pain and discomfort," and at a local hospital, an exploratory laparotomy revealed that "artichoke leaves were found lodged within Plaintiff's small bowell [sic]."

Here's how to keep that from happening to you.
FULL POST



Breakfast buffet
November 18th, 2010
09:00 AM ET
Share this on:

While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday and the most delicious finds on TV.

November 18 is National Vichyssoise Day.

Though the name is French, Vichyssoise was invented at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in New York City in 1917. Louis Diat, a Frenchman and the head chef of the Ritz, named his creation after the town he was born in.

Vichyssoise is a soup made of puréed leeks and potatoes, cream and chicken stock. Like revenge, Vichyssoise is a soup best served cold.

What's on TV?
FULL POST



Pinterest
Archive
November 2010
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
| Part of